Second Africa ICT Best Practice conference in Ouaga

Posté par BAUDOUIN SCHOMBE le 26 avril 2008

Second Africa ICT Best Practice conference in Ouaga – Closing the gap between words and action

 

This week, the capital of Burkina Faso, Ouagadougou hosted the second annual “Africa ICT Best Practice Forum” which serves as a practical way for Governments from across Africa to share their own experiences and demonstrate practical examples of successful technology solutions in their respective countries. It attracted a large crowd of Ministers and civil servants from all over Africa and was held at the same time as Burkina Faso’s national Internet week and the local ICT event SITICO. Isabelle Gross was there to find out what was happening.

Attendance at the forum was sponsored by Microsoft, the European Union and the Government of Burkina Faso so it attracted high-level attendees. But if those attending were high-level so was the rhetoric surrounding the event. For sponsors wanted nothing less than to:” accelerate Africa’s social and economic development, help foster more efficient and transparent public services, deliver the benefits of information technology much more broadly across Africa, facilitate e-government initiatives, promote technology access and capacity building, share regional and global best practices, … ”. And perhaps in the afternoon, to bring about world peace.

But the expectations of the attendees themselves were also high in terms of securing
international public and private financing and cheap or free provisioning of hardware and software. There is no doubt that the Minister of Education of Burkina Faso appreciated the donation of 50 Intel-powered Classmate PCs running Windows software for the Lycée Philippe Zinda Kabore in Ouagadougou. However, this is a secondary school which currently has 6,000 students so it will now have one computer for every 120 pupils.

Whilst Rome wasn’t built in day, it is clear that there is still a considerable gap between the efforts of private sector initiatives and the actual commitments of the Governments themselves. For without a regular allocation in the education budget, ICT initiatives will remain like a dripping tap hitting a stone: regular and insistent but making little real impact. Countries may be poor but hard choices need to be made if the gap between intention and action is to be closed.

Despite the harmonious choreography of presentations of best practise case studies of projects implemented across the African continent, the question that lingered was what drives what? Is it the desire for more ICT assistance from African countries or the need for a more carefully thought through commercial offer from international ICT vendors to fit the context? Is it Government-driven, supply-led initiatives or demand-led initiatives (both public and private) that will generate their own momentum? If countries were making hard decisions with more of their own money then perhaps these issues would fall into starker contrast for them.

Everybody agrees that African public administrations need more information and communication technology to serve their citizen better and to support vital economic growth. According to Kedikilwe O. Kedikilwe, coordinator at the Ministry of Agriculture in Botswana, the implementation of Botswana Livestock Identification and Traceback System (LITS) has ensured that the country’s farmers have been able to continue exporting their beef to the European Union. In a country that can count more cattle than people (2.5 million beef cattle against 1.3 millions inhabitants) and exports 90% of its beef to the European Union, the introduction of new, more stringent European regulations covering the origin of the meat entering the European market had to be addressed as it was a clear threat to the country’s income.

Today each animal has a tracking device implanted to provide the required information which is fed into a national database. The implementation of Botswana livestock identification system has not only secured local farmers’ income but also enabled it to reduce the level of cattle theft. And while the UK was struggling to contain a major outbreak of foot and mouth a few years ago, Botswana had the disease under control. So African countries can teach Europe a lesson or two.

It is perhaps unfair to highlight the low level of computers in Burkina Faso’s schools as the country has a range of initiatives to address the digital divide. It has an infrastructure project for building a national fibre network reaching every administrative centre in its provinces/departments at an estimated cost of CFA50 billion francs (over US$100 million). Undoubtedly, this will lay the foundation for improving service delivery and making it more faster and more cost-effective. However, it remains difficult to believe that such project could become commercially viable in the short to mid-term in a country that has a literacy rate of about 30%.

The Government recognises this gap and supports grass root project like training and the annual Internet week. In 2007, around 6,000 people (civil servants, teachers, students and general public) received a 5 hour training course covering: basic understanding of computer hardware and software; email: setting up an email account and sending and receiving emails; Internet and how to carry out Internet searches. This year, the organisers hope to train over 7,000 people in 34 towns across the country in an effort to reduce the digital illiteracy rate.

As ever, the difficulty for African Governments is to try and get multiple initiatives from building a backbone (the equivalent of building a national road network) to raising the standards of education to coalesce into a focused form, where each initiatives actually feeds into the other. All too often the digital access project has unreliable and costly bandwidth, little or no content and services and is not of sufficient scale to move the considerable mountain range of barriers it addresses. Government is always attempting to respond to a wide range of needs and often failing to meet any of them effectively: implementing initiatives remains its Achilles heel. Ministries often fail to co-operate and co-ordinate their own initiatives. Change can be made but it will probably require a different attitude from African government itself.

Despite the fact that there were significant local events and a major international ICT event taking place at the same time, there was no real interaction between them. In the course of the forum, Microsoft’s CEO, Steve Ballmer announced a new partnership with the government of Angola which also includes a commercial agreement on software. It is likely that Microsoft will also reach a similar partnership agreement with Congo-Brazzaville in the near future. Follow-up action on sharing existing and new best ICT practices in Africa will be fostered by the launch of a website with an interactive database to post them to. The site which can be found at http://www.africaictbestpractices.net has been built by local IT company Softnet Burkina SA.

As international ICT representatives departed on the promise to meet again next year, Joachim Tankoano, Burkina Faso’s busy Minister of Post, Technology, Information and Communication went on to open the fourth annual international ICT show (SITICO) where local IT companies showcased their products and services until the end of the week. Over the last couple of years, the number of local IT companies has increased considerably. Hugue Kouraogo, Head of IT company Hugo Tech told us that more competition has pushed down charges for IT services and there were similar falls in prices on IT products like computers. He reckoned that local IT companies will have to diversify and offer new services to stay in the race. His company is now also offering security and CCTV solutions.
At the other end of the spectrum, a French-Burkinabe charitable organisation l’Atelier du Bocage (part of the Emmaus charity) is promoting its IT waste recycling project. Based in Ouagadougou, the organisation sells refurbished computers and accessories but also offers a recycling service. The recycling scheme has started in November 207 so the project is just beginning. According to Jean-Yves Taillandier, Head of the project, recycling IT waste requires high-tech processing facilities which currently don’t exist in Burkina Faso. Since copper is the only row material that can be recycled locally, the remaining components are shipped back to France for further processing. This recycling project, even if the IT waste is only partially recycled locally, is nevertheless an interesting awareness initiative as sooner or later the 50 donated Classmate PCs will themselves need to be recycled.

Publié dans INTERNET | Pas de Commentaire »

Célébration de la première journée mondiale de lutte contre le paludisme

Posté par BAUDOUIN SCHOMBE le 26 avril 2008

De jeanmariebolika@yahoo.fr

Santé

Célébration de la première journée mondiale de lutte contre le paludisme

Par Le Potentiel

Instituée le 25 avril de chaque année à l’issue de la rencontre des chefs d’Etats et des gouvernements africains en avril 2000 à Abuja, au Nigeria, la journée africaine de lutte contre le paludisme est devenue mondiale à l’issue de la soixantième assemblée générale de l’OMS tenue en mai 2007. Cette première journée célébrée ce vendredi 25 avril est placée sous le thème « Le paludisme, une maladie sans frontière » avec comme Slogan : « Lutter contre le paludisme, agissez maintenant » qui interpelle le gouvernement congolais, vu l’ampleur de la maladie.

Dans le cadre des préparatifs de la célébration de la journée mondiale de lutte contre le paludisme en RDC, le Programme national de lutte contre le paludisme (PNLP) a organisé, le mercredi 23 avril 2008, une journée d’information à l’intention des professionnels des médias.

L’objectif est d’informer et de doter les professionnels de médias d’arguments concernant la première journée mondiale de lutte contre le paludisme et pour leur engagement en tant que partenaire du PNLP dans cette lutte.

Le directeur du PNLP qui a planché sur la politique nationale de lutte contre le paludisme a souligné la nécessité de la communication dans le changement de comportement de la population en matière de prévention et de traitement de la malaria. A cet effet, Dr Benjamin Atua a souligné l’ampleur de la maladie en RDC avec comme cible les enfants de moins de cinq ans et les femmes enceintes. Selon lui, 107 pays au monde sont frappés par cette maladie, mais le Nigeria et la RDC portent la moitié du poids mondial. Et d’ajouter, la malaria constitue la première cause de morbidité et de mortalité chez les enfants de moins de cinq ans. Elle entraîne 67% de consultations médicales externes, 47% de décès, 18% de létalité d’hospitalisation et 180.000 décès annuels.

Chez la femme enceinte, la malaria occasionne 41% de consultations médicales, 54% de cas d’hospitalisation.

MALARIA, UN FACTEUR DE SOUS-DEVELOPPEMENT

Dr Benjamin Atua a également noté que la malaria constitue un lourd fardeau socio-économique et, par conséquent, un frein aux OMD (Objectifs du millénaire pour le développement), non seulement du fait que le coup global d’une prise en charge s’élève à au moins 69$ pour les femmes enceintes et 95$ pour les enfants de moins de cinq ans, mais aussi il occasionne 21% de cas d’absentéisme scolaire et au travail. A en croire le directeur du PNLP, il y a nécessité que le gouvernement investisse dans la lutte contre ce fléau, car la malaria constitue, à elle seule, un obstacle aux cinq OMD, à savoir la réduction de l’extrême pauvreté et la faim, la réduction de la mortalité infantile, l’amélioration de la santé maternelle, la réduction des maladies et l’éducation primaire pour tous. D’où la nécessité d’investir davantage dans la lutte pour atteindre ces objectifs de manière rentable.

Quant à la prise en charge de la malaria au niveau du pays, Dr Benjamin Atua a fait savoir qu’on administre la combinaison de l’Artesunate et l’Amodiaquine pour traiter la malaria simple, la Quinine par la voie orale en cas de malaria grave et la quinine par voie intraveineuse intervient en dernier ressort.

RAYMONDE SENGA KOSSY ET VERON-CLEMENT KONGO

Publié dans SANTE | Pas de Commentaire »

Paludisme, un combat de tous les jours

Posté par BAUDOUIN SCHOMBE le 26 avril 2008

logo Syfia-Grands-Lacs
http://www.syfia-grands-lacs.info

24-04-2008

RD Congo

Thaddée Hyawe-Hinyi

(Syfia RD Congo) Le paludisme est combattu sans relâche au Sud-Kivu, en RD Congo, par les agents de santé. Mais les résultats de ces efforts sont limités par l’inconscience de certains habitants. Bilan, à la veille de la première Journée mondiale contre le paludisme, le 25 avril.

Les chiffres sont éloquents. En 2007, la province du Sud-Kivu, dans l’est de la RD Congo, a enregistré 3,1 millions de cas de paludisme, dont une grande majorité d’enfants, pour une population estimée à 4,4 millions d’habitants. C’est ce que rapporte le bureau de coordination de Bukavu du Programme national de lutte contre le paludisme (PNLP). Et ce, malgré les efforts entrepris.
Le ministère de la Santé mène, en effet, une lutte contre le paludisme en rapprochant les infrastructures de soin de la population. Au Sud-Kivu, « la province est divisée en cinq districts sanitaires qui comprennent 34 zones gérées par des médecins et 533 centres placés sous la responsabilité des assistants médicaux », compte Claude Wilondja, coordinateur du bureau chargé du fonctionnement des établissements des soins.
Les centres de santé sensibilisent la population sur l’entretien de la parcelle et de la maison pour limiter les foyers de moustiques. Ils vulgarisent aussi l’utilisation de moustiquaires imprégnées d’insecticide, dont la distribution par l’Unicef a commencé dans la province en 2005 et qui diminuent le nombre de piqûres et donc de contamination par le parasite. « Ces moustiquaires sont distribuées aux femmes qui viennent aux consultations prénatales moyennant 0,5 $ par ménage. En 2007, 635 800 moustiquaires ont été distribuées », lit-on dans le rapport annuel du Programme élargi de vaccination qui a couvert la campagne de distribution.

Indispensable prévention
Par ailleurs, lors des consultations prénatales, les femmes reçoivent de la quinine buvable (un antipaludique) de la seizième et à la vingt-huitième semaine de grossesse pour préserver leur bébé. Ce sont les personnes les plus à risques avec les enfants de moins de cinq ans, « mais, à l’est de la RD Congo, c’est toute la population qui est vulnérable », note le coordinateur du PNLP.
Mais, pendant que certains luttent contre la maladie, d’autres contribuent à sa persistance. Certains parents utilisent la moustiquaire pour eux et en privent leurs enfants, qui restent exposés aux piqûres des anophèles. D’autres moustiquaires sont revendues aux pêcheurs qui les utilisent pour capturer des alevins, grâce au maillage serré.
La prolifération de dispensaires pirates, de tradipraticiens et de pharmacies mobiles avec un système médiocre de conservation des médicaments complique aussi le travail. « Ces intervenants ne travaillent pas selon les normes. Ils administrent des cures incomplètes et parfois des médicaments périmés. Les malades viennent ensuite au centre de santé, quand leur situation est devenue inquiétante », regrette Pascal Mihigo, infirmier du centre diocésain de Muhungu. Mal pris, les traitements n’éliminent pas la maladie et entraînent des résistances aux médicaments. Pour les éviter, le personnel médical demande aux malades de ne pas se soigner eux-mêmes et sans examen médical préalable.

Publié dans SANTE | Pas de Commentaire »

Afrique : président un jour, président toujours

Posté par BAUDOUIN SCHOMBE le 26 avril 2008

(Syfia Cameroun) Sans aucune consultation populaire préalable, le Cameroun vient de modifier sa Constitution pour supprimer la limitation du nombre de mandats présidentiels. Une tendance qui gagne de nombreux pays d’Afrique.

Paul Biya, 75 ans, au pouvoir au Cameroun depuis 26 ans, a finalement obtenu ce qu’il voulait. Le 10 avril dernier, il a fait modifier la Constitution pour supprimer la limitation du nombre de mandats présidentiels introduite en 1996. Il rejoint ainsi la liste des présidents africains qui ont changé leur loi fondamentale de leur pays pour se maintenir à leur poste : Idriss Déby (Tchad), Omar Bongo (Gabon), feu Gnassingbé Eyadema (Togo), Lansana Conté (Guinée), Zine El Abidine Ben Ali (Tunisie), etc. En Algérie, Abdelaziz Bouteflika serait sur la même voie.
Au Cameroun, l’Assemblée nationale où le parti au pouvoir est largement majoritaire (85 % de sièges) à la suite des législatives contestées de juillet 2007, a facilement adopté les modifications proposées. Cette révision doit permettre au Président camerounais de briguer un mandat supplémentaire en 2011. En annonçant en décembre dernier son intention de modifier la Constitution, Paul Biya s’était justifié en arguant que l’article à réviser limitait la volonté populaire, « limitation qui s’accorde mal avec l’idée même de choix démocratique ».
Un avis loin d’être partagé par tous dans son pays… Pour John Fru Ndi, le leader de l’opposition camerounaise, « la limitation du mandat présidentiel sert à contrôler les démocraties qui ne sont pas encore bien assises et où les pratiques de la gouvernance tardent à s’installer, comme au Cameroun ». « Le Cameroun ne saurait être une monarchie où une personne, quelle que soit sa compétence, peut prétendre rester à la tête de l’État indéfiniment », complète un membre de Plateforme de la société civile pour la démocratie qui regroupe plusieurs associations.

Absence de débats

En Afrique, un nombre grandissant de présidents s’accrochent au pouvoir, le plus souvent à coups d’élections contestées. Seul le verrou de limitation constitutionnelle des mandats semble alors pouvoir garantir l’alternance. À l’association Collectif des citoyens patriotes, on avance une explication : « En Afrique, quel que soit le régime et le pays, au bout de dix années de pouvoir et par le fait des nominations, toute l’administration est déjà totalement inféodée au dirigeant en place. On aboutit ainsi à la dictature de cet individu sur l’ensemble du personnel administratif, des hommes d’affaires, des artistes, etc ». Comme cette même administration organise les élections, c’est tout ‘naturellement’ que le pouvoir en place reste majoritaire.
Pour éviter la voie parlementaire qui s’assimile souvent à une voie de garage, l’Union européenne, à la suite de l’ambassadeur des États-Unis, a souligné en mars dernier l’importance « de soumettre les propositions de révision constitutionnelle à un débat large, libre et ouvert, incluant toutes les composantes de la société camerounaise ». Il n’en a rien été. Au contraire.
En février à Douala, un rassemblement de l’opposition contre la révision a fait deux morts tués par balle. Le même mois, la répression des jeunes qui manifestaient contre la hausse du prix du carburant et des produits de première nécessité et aussi contre la révision constitutionnelle a fait entre 40 et 100 morts. Lapiro de Mbanga, musicien auteur de « Constitution constipée », et Joe la Conscience, qui a chanté « Emmerdement constitutionnel » sont en prison, officiellement, pour avoir commandité des émeutes pour l’un et pour « Réunion et manifestation interdite » pour l’autre. Dans les médias d’État, les avis défavorables à la révision constitutionnelle sont passés sous silence. Des radios et des télévisions privées sont par ailleurs fermées pour divers motifs. Avec la modification de la constitution, les grandes villes sont fortement militarisées.

Marche arrière

Le continent semble faire marche arrière. En 1990, les dirigeants africains avaient en effet accepté, à contrecœur il est vrai, le multipartisme à la suite de la conférence de La Baule où feu le président François Mitterrand avait lié l’aide à l’ouverture démocratique. Pour tenter de garantir l’alternance, dans de nombreux pays le pouvoir et l’opposition ont limité à deux le nombre de mandats consécutifs (de 5 ou 7 ans selon les pays).
Mais, de nombreux dirigeants n’ont plus voulu quitter leurs postes et sont revenus aux anciennes dispositions constitutionnelles. Certains parce qu’ils s’inquiètent aussi des possibles accusations pouvant les mener devant le Tribunal pénal international le jour où ils ne seront plus couverts par l’immunité présidentielle. Ce recul dans les pays francophones a même inspiré certains présidents de pays anglophones comme Yoweri Museveni, en Ouganda, qui, en 2005, a amendé la Constitution pour être reconduit à la présidence en 2006.
Au Bénin, l’ex-président Mathieu Kérékou s’est en revanche heurté à l’hostilité des députés et de la société civile, lorsqu’il a exprimé son intention de réviser la Constitution. Une exception qui confirme la règle.

 

Publié dans GOUVERNANCE | Pas de Commentaire »

Jour 5 en direct de la 12e Conférence de la CNUCED

Posté par BAUDOUIN SCHOMBE le 25 avril 2008

Jour 5 en direct de la 12e Conférence de la CNUCED dans COMMERCE ET DEVELOPPEMENT clip_image001 

En direct d’Accra

Jour 5

Les travaux de la conférence de la CNUCED ont réellement commencé ce Lundi 21 Avril. Ces travaux ont lieux à quatre niveaux différents :

- Le débat général, où se succèdent les déclarations des membres de la CNUCED. Ces déclarations sont retransmises en direct sur le site de la CNUCED.
- Les négociations sur le texte de la conférence qui ne sont pas publiques
- Les tables rondes thématiques de hauts niveaux organisées en plénières
- Les tables rondes thématiques organisées dans le forum de la société civile où sont invitées les personnalités présentes à la conférence. Les travaux présentés dans la newsletter sont essentiellement issus des tables rondes thématiques de la plénière et de la société civile.

Synthèse des tables rondes thématiques

Débat avec Pascal Lamy

Après une intervention en plénière, lundi 5 Avril, le Directeur général de l’OMC, Pascal Lamy est intervenu dans un débat auprès de la société civile.

Lors de sa présentation, Pascal Lamy a essentiellement insisté sur la gestion de la crise alimentaire actuelle. Une réponse de court terme doit être apportée par les politiques nationales ou régionales des états : diminution des barrières douanières, taxe aux exportations des produits alimentaires, ou subventions à l’alimentation. Aucunes de ces mesures ne sont limitées par l’OMC. Une réponse de court terme peut également être apportée par l’aide alimentaire.

Dans le moyen long terme, la réponse à la crise alimentaire doit être une réorientation de l’investissement dans l’agriculture (au travers de la BM, du FMI, de la CNUCED, de la FAO et des politiques internes). La libéralisation des échanges agricoles en donnant des signaux de marchés appropriés aux producteurs devraient, toujours selon Pascal Lamy, favoriser la production mondiale et donc être une réponse à la crise.

L’augmentation des prix agricoles pourrait donc être une bonne nouvelle pour les agriculteurs.

Après cette courte allocution, Pascal Lamy a laissé une place importante au débat. Comme l’exigeait sa position, il s’est concentré sur les fonctions de l’OMC rejetant régulièrement les questions n’entrant pas dans le strict domaine de compétences de l’OMC. Le débat a parfois été difficile lorsque les interventions portaient sur la libéralisation du commerce de manière générale et que Pascal Lamy répondait que ce n’était pas uniquement du ressort de l’OMC (par exemple sur la régulation des services et investissements dans les ALE). Plusieurs questions ont porté sur la marge de manœuvre laissée par l’OMC dans la mise en place des ALE Régionaux (art XXIV du GATT). Il a très simplement concédé que l’article était très flou et laissait une grande marge de manœuvre d’interprétation. Il a par ailleurs regretté que ces accords ne soient pas mieux régulés par l’OMC. De même, il a indiqué qu’aucun pays ne poussait fortement pour sa renégociation alors même l’article XXIV est à l’ordre du jour du DDA. Il semble possible d’interpréter cette intervention auprès de la société civile comme un signe pour qu’elle pousse les gouvernements ACP à se saisir de la question de la renégociation de l’art XXIV. Terminons cette brève par une anecdote de Babacar du ROPPA qui compare le système commercial international à une maison, les fondations sont la BM et le FMI, l’OMC les murs et la toiture percée c’est le marché que l’on sait imparfait. APE, où quand le diable se cache dans les détails…

La thématique des APE est revenue dans une grande partie des tables rondes. Nous présentons donc ici une synthèse d’une table ronde particulièrement représentative des débats qui ont eu lieu les jours précédents.

Le Dr Davis, ministre adjoint du commerce et de l’industrie de l’Afrique du Sud a eu des mots très forts contre les APE. Il a particulièrement mobilisé l’image du diable présent dans les détails. Sur l’intégration régionale, il reconnaît volontiers que l’idée est bonne mais la mise en place est bien loin de la théorie ! Si, avant la signature d’un APE complet, il est éventuellement possible de mettre en place une union douanière, il est a contrario très clair qu’il ne sera pas possible de créer une véritable intégration régionale (avec des règles communes sur l’investissement, les services, …). Il a également fortement dénoncé la réduction de l’espace politique des pays ACP, en citant par exemple l’interdiction des taxes aux exportations promue par l’UE.

M Diop, ministre du commerce du Sénégal, a déploré l’absence de vision développement dans les APE, qui était déjà visible dans l’accord de Cotonou où la partie commerciale était très développée en opposition à la partie développement. L’essentiel de son intervention a ensuite porté sur le renforcement de la cohérence des positions des pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest et la mobilisation de ces pays pour leur propre développement : « C’est à nous de faire ce que nous devons faire et que nous n’avons pas encore fait ».

Enfin, le Ministre brésilien M. Carlos a fait une intervention sur la démarche que le Brésil engage à l’OMC sur la clause de la Nation la Plus Favorisée (NPF) incluse dans les APE. Ce n’est pour l’instant qu’une démarche politique (et non pas une démarche juridique) qui se fonde sur les limitations au commerce Sud-Sud que cette clause implique. En effet, il semblerait que la clause NPF des APE oblige les pays ACP à accorder à l’UE toutes préférences commerciales qu’ils accorderaient à un PED (comme le Brésil). Le Brésil s’estime donc lésé car ne pourrait pas bénéficier d’accès préférentiels aux marchés ACP. Notons par ailleurs que c’est toujours au nom du développement des pays du Sud, au travers de la promotion du commerce Sud-Sud, que le Brésil cherche à défendre ses marchés d’exportation. Le deuxième aspect du discours a porté sur le nouveau paysage des relations commerciales internationales : la multiplication des accords de libre échange régionaux. Il faut bien voir que dans le futur, l’OMC ne sera qu’une base de négociation et que les accords régionaux seront généralisés. Le Brésil ne voit pas ce nouveau paysage comme une menace au niveau des droits de douanes qui sont relativement bien encadrés dans le cadre de l’OMC mais au niveau de la multiplication des règles commerciales (règles d’origine, d’investissements, SPS, …) qui ne seront pas les mêmes en fonction des différents accords.

Le REPAOC demande à l’UE d’arrêter de les tromper : on peut comprendre que l’UE ait des intérêts économiques dans un ALE avec l’Afrique de l’Ouest mais il faut que la CE arrête de dire que c’est un accord pour le développement.

Oxfam a lancé lundi 21 avril son dernier rapport sur les APE « Partnership or power play », à l’occasion de la CNUCED en présence de la Société civile et de représentants de la Commission européenne. Il expose l’analyse exhaustive des accords intérimaires initiés en décembre 2007, au regard des objectifs de développement que ces accords étaient censés promouvoir. Le rapport a reçu un bon accueil de la part des représentants de la Société civile et bénéficié d’une couverture médiatique importante dans les média africains.

Contacts : Jean-Denis CROLA : +33 (1) 56 98 24 42 / jdcrola@oxfamfrance.fr / www.oxfamfrance.org

Nos commentaires :

La position du Brésil sur les APE est relativement classique : sous couvert d’une volonté de développement, il promeut les échanges Sud-Sud qui lui sont particulièrement profitables. L’affichage pro-développement du Brésil ne semble donc pas particulièrement justifié. Il est possible de comparer ce positionnement actuel à celui qui avait été le leur sur le dossier coton.

Par ailleurs, des analyses détaillées des accords intérimaires doivent nécessairement être conduites, à l’instar du rapport d’Oxfam, pour évaluer les effets de ces accords sur le développement des pays du Sud : « le diable est dans les détails ». L’inclusion de la clause NPF ou l’interdiction de relever les droits de douanes doivent être particulièrement analysées.

Enfin, il ressort clairement qu’une nouvelle lecture du paysage commercial international est nécessaire. L’OMC ne sera qu’un socle commun des relations commerciales. Les Accords Régionaux de Libre Echanges sont appelés à se multiplier pour obtenir en bilatéral ce qui ne peut être obtenu en multilatéral (services, investissement, accès aux marchés, etc.). Ces accords pourraient même devenir un moyen de promouvoir le commerce Sud-Sud.

Contacts :

GRET : Damien Lagandré, lagandre@gret.org Oxfam France – Agir ici : Jean-Denis Crola, jdcrola@oxfamfrance.org CCFD : Ambroise Mazal, a.mazal@ccfd.asso.fr

Jour 4

Dimanche 20 avril : Ouverture officielle de la CNUCED XII

La XIIème CNUCED a été ouverte par le président du Brésil, Lula Da Silva, le président du Ghana, John Kufuor, et le secrétaire général de l’ONU, Ban Ki Moon.

Résumé de l’intervention du Président du Brésil

Dans un premier temps, Lula Da Silva plaide pour le concept « d’espace politique » national, misant sur la responsabilité des gouvernements pour lutter contre la pauvreté (qui doit être distinguée du système de commerce international). Le président du Brésil, qui était l’hôte de la précédente CNUCED, explique que la libéralisation a déjà bénéficié aux PED au travers de la réduction des subventions aux exportations par les pays du Nord, de la diminution du protectionnisme, de l’amélioration de l’accès pour les pays du Sud aux marchés des pays développés…

Il appelle également au développement des échanges Sud – Sud, pour se dégager de la dépendance du Nord.

Cependant, il a également rappelé que les échanges ne sont pas les seules solutions au développement. Il appelle à prendre des mesures concrètes pour les PED :

- Les Pays développés doivent respecter leur engagement pris à Monterrey d’accorder 0,7% de PIB pour l’Aide Publique au Développement.
- Il appel à la création de mécanismes financiers novateurs (à l’image de Unitaid, financé par une taxe sur les vols d’avions)
- L’aide au commerce est particulièrement adaptée aux PED et c’est la CNUCED l’organisme le plus à même de promouvoir et réguler l’aide pour le commerce.
- Enfin, il a clairement plaidé pour le développement des agrocarburants en Afrique car ils permettent de diversifier les exportations des pays du Sud, d’attirer des investissements directs étrangers, et de fournir de l’emploi. Au Brésil, la production d’éthanol aurait diminué la malnutrition.

Les agrocarburants ne sont pas en contradiction avec les objectifs de lutte contre la faim.

Alors que le discours de Kufuor s’est essentiellement cantonné aux messages de bienvenus et au rappel historique du rôle de la CNUCED, le secrétaire général de l’ONU, M Ban Ki Moon a tenu un discours fort sur la crise alimentaire actuelle et ses liens avec la libéralisation des échanges. En effet, après avoir rappelé que le commerce et la mondialisation était à l’origine d’un cercle vertueux de croissance, il a clairement précisé que les risques étaient de plus en plus grands pour le développement car la croissance ne bénéficie pas à tous.

La croissance des prix alimentaires risque, si la crise est mal gérée, d’engendrer des réactions en cascades pouvant aller jusqu’à des déstabilisations politiques. Ces trois dernières années, le monde a consommé plus de produits alimentaires qu’il n’en a produits ! Les solutions à apporter sont dans un premier temps des solutions d’urgence en augmentant le budget du PAM qui va avoir besoin de 750 millions de dollars supplémentaires pour faire face à l’augmentation des prix alimentaires. A moyen et long terme, il prône une révolution verte pour augmenter très fortement les productions agricoles dans les pays du Sud. Pour cela, la Banque Mondiale va augmenter ses prêts à l’agriculture de 400 à 800 millions de dollars d’ici 2009.

Lecture critique du discours de Lula

Babacar Ndao (ROPPA) commente le discours de Lula : « on ne se fait plus d’illusion. Sous couvert d’un discours avant-gardiste il promeut la libéralisation, au bénéfice de son pays qui possède des ressources naturelles et des ressources humaines très importantes ». Deux caractéristiques se dégagent en effet du discours de Lula : d’une part un discours tiers-mondiste virulent contre les injustices, dans lequel il accuse les pays du Nord d’être responsables du sous-développement des pays du Sud (protectionnisme, subventions à leurs producteurs, insuffisance de l’Aide publique au développement,…) ; d’autre part il promeut une plus grande libéralisation des échanges basée sur « la non-discrimination dans les relations commerciales » (règle cardinale de l’OMC), appelant les pays du Sud à se dégager de la dépendance avec le Nord en développant le commerce Sud-Sud.

Le paradoxe entre un discours militant et des pratiques commerciales offensives est évident. Le Président du Brésil semble ainsi vouloir optimiser la puissance commerciale que son pays a acquise au cours de la dernière décennie, à travers les exportations de matières premières agricoles notamment. Il rejoint la Chine et l’Inde dans les puissances émergentes qui se disputent les parts de marché des pays en développement, et de l’Afrique en premier lieu. Coopération et développement humain semblent bien absents…

Jour 3

- Lire la Déclaration des ONG présentes à Accra à l’issue de la consultation de la société civile organisée autour de la CNUCED XII

Lors de la troisième journée du forum de la société civile la déclaration des organisations non gouvernementales a été adoptée en session plénière. Cette déclaration sera présentée lors de la session d’ouverture officielle de la CNUCED XII. Elle a été élaborée tout au long du forum lors de sessions de travail en plénière (télécharger la déclaration en anglais).

Synthèse des tables rondes thématiques :

- La stratégie européenne « Global Europe »

Pourquoi signer un accord commercial bilatéral ou régional avec l’Union européenne (UE) ? Quels bénéfices en tirer ? Ce sont les questions que se sont posées des représentants de la société civile des pays Andins, de l’ASEAN et des pays ACP, trois ensembles en cours de négociation ou ayant négociés des accords commerciaux avec l’Union européenne. L’occasion de prendre du recul sur la mise en oeuvre la stratégie pour « une Europe compétitive dans une économie mondialisée » ou « Global Europe ». Si pour l’Union européenne, les APE ne font pas partie de cette stratégie globale, puisqu’ils sont les seuls à disposer de mesures spécifiques pour encourager le développement, de nombreux points communs ont été mis en avant par les intervenants.

La stratégie « Global Europe » donne toute latitude au Commissaire au Commerce européen pour tenter de signer, avec les pays en voie de développement, des accords commerciaux régionaux et bilatéraux dont le contenu va au-delà des règles imposées par l’OMC : des accords « OMC plus » dans le jargon communautaire. Il a d’ailleurs été rappelé une déclaration de Pascal Lamy, lorsqu’il était encore Commissaire européen au Commerce : « Nous avons toujours recours aux accords commerciaux bilatéraux pour atteindre des objectifs qui vont au-delà des normes établies par l’OMC ».

Voici rapidement les points communs présentés par les intervenants sur ce que l’UE réclame des pays en développement à travers les différents accords abordés :

• Réduction des taxes à l’importation sur les biens industriels et agricoles et suppression des barrières non tarifaires à l’importation • Suppression des restrictions à l’exportation, de matières premières en particulier • Faire respecter des droits de propriété intellectuelle rigides au profit des entreprises européennes • Baisse radicale des réglementations imposées aux entreprises européennes de services • Diminution des réglementations en matière d’investissements effectués par les multinationales européennes • Cesser d’accorder un traitement préférentiel à leurs entreprises lors de la concession de marchés publics

Toutes ces mesures sont par ailleurs négociées avec un agenda très dense et agressif. Bien des points communs, donc, entre les APE et les accords commerciaux signés avec le Mexique, l’Afrique du Sud (avant de l’intégrer dans une région de négociation africaine) ou ceux négociés avec l’ASEAN. Et l’aide européenne est bien souvent mise au service des négociations avec les pays en développement. A ce sujet Martin Khor, secrétaire général de l’organisation Third World Network, a conclu l’atelier par une anecdote intéressante. Lors d’une réunion des négociateurs ACP à Bruxelles avec la Commission européenne à laquelle il était convié pour exposer les enjeux de la négociation des « Questions de Singapour », seule le négociateur des Caraïbes semblait vouloir mettre sur la table la négociation des services et des investissements.

En aparté, il se confie à Martin Khor : l’UE doit financer un important projet de recherche dans la région… et le négociateur craint – peut être à juste titre – que si la région des Caraïbes ne négocie pas ces aspects, les budgets disparaîtront.

Et Martin Khor de conclure : « à l’heure où le sommet sur l’efficacité de l’aide approche… Efficace l’aide ? Pour les négociations européennes, sûrement ! »

En conclusion, il est possible de faire écho au directeur du département économique du ministère des affaires étrangères brésilien, M Carlos, qui considère que le futur de la mondialisation est une fragmentation du système commerciale international en une multitude d’accords plurilatéraux superposés aux règles internes différentes, souvent non compatibles. Cet éclatement du système commercial international ne peut se faire qu’au détriment des pays les plus pauvres qui ont les capacités de négociations les plus faibles.

JOUR 2

clip_image003 dans COMMERCE ET DEVELOPPEMENTLe Deuxième jour du Forum de la société civile, le 18 Avril, a été marqué par l’intervention du Secrétaire général de la CNUCED Supachai Panitchpakdi, qui a plaidé pour une meilleure intégration des pays du Sud dans les choix de gouvernance locale, et le passage à une « deuxième génération de la mondialisation, qui soit multipolaire ».

Depuis 10 ans qu’il est SG, il pourrait pour la première fois augmenter son personnel, grâce à une augmentation du budget pour laquelle le SG de l’ONU est favorable.

Le SG a exprimé sa préoccupation devant la répétition de certaines crises, « que l’on pourrait tenter d’empêcher ». Son intervention a principalement porté sur la crise alimentaire mondiale actuelle. Il précise trois mesures qui pourraient être mises en œuvre pour assurer la durabilité de l’approvisionnement alimentaire :

- Des mesures immédiates pour aider au transfert des volumes à travers le monde. Les crises sont parfois créées de façon artificielle, et les spéculateurs qui gèlent des stocks pour faire monter les cours ont une responsabilité.

- Une approche intermédiaire (que la CNUCED a exprimée dans ses publications), sur la base du constat que l’agriculture n’occupe que 10% de l’aide au développement (70% va à l’aide sociale). La recherche scientifique est par exemple totalement ignorée : la communauté internationale doit œuvrer à renforcer la productivité agricole. Les infrastructures pour les produits alimentaires, l’irrigation, etc, doivent également être soutenues.

- Sur le long terme, il faut veiller à ce que le commerce ne soit pas un obstacle au développement, et à la production alimentaire par les producteurs locaux. Ceux-ci ne sont pas les bénéficiaires aujourd’hui des prix élevés. Il faut engager le processus pour une révolution verte en Afrique : c’est aussi de choix politiques dont nous avons besoin.

Il a également abordé de manière plus brève les thèmes suivants :

- Les pays de l’OCDE doivent respecter leur engagement sur le niveau de l’APD (0,7 points de PIB)

- La libéralisation du secteur financier doit être régulée (les Hedge Funds notamment)

- L’aide pour le commerce est fondamentale dans le mandat de la CNUCED, qui est l’organe des Nations-Unies le mieux équipé pour réguler cette aide.

- Enfin, il a rappelé l’importance de la CNUCED dans les expertises sur les APE et a appelé les organisations de la société civile à être particulièrement vigilantes sur les questions d’investissements directs étrangers.

Synthèses thématiques des groupes de travail.

Les travaux de la société civile se sont poursuivis durant toute cette deuxième journée au cours des tables rondes.

La régionalisation

Dans quelles mesures l’intégration régionale est une solution à la mondialisation des échanges ? Les nombreuses discussions autours des APE ont largement mis en avant les besoins d’intégration régionale pour assurer le développement économique des ACP. La nécessité de la régionalisation est clairement identifiée étant donné la faible taille des pays ACP et en particulier en Afrique de l’Ouest.

Cependant, l’intégration régionale ne peut être qu’un catalyseur du développement économique. Ce n’est ni une condition nécessaire, ni une condition suffisante au développement. Historiquement, de très nombreuses tentatives d’intégration régionale ont eu lieu ; en règles générales les échecs furent patents. Une explication avancée est celle du manque de consultation et de prise en compte des populations.

L’aspect économique n’est pas suffisant pour promouvoir une intégration régionale en Afrique. De ce point de vue, la situation en Afrique de l’Ouest est particulièrement intéressante. Les pays créés lors de la colonisation ne reposent pas sur des unités sociologiques cohérentes. A contrario, l’Afrique de l’Ouest présente une certaine cohérence sociologique : de nombreuses ethnies sont présentes sur l’ensemble de la sous-région. De plus, avant la colonisation, de grands empires régnaient sur plusieurs pays de la région. En Afrique de l’Ouest, la région a donc un sens pour la population, ce qui rend l’intégration régionale pertinente.

Cependant, depuis la création de la CEDEAO en 1975, le bilan est mitigé. Certaines réussites sont importantes : le passeport CEDEAO permettant la libre circulation des personnes, par exemple. A contrario, du point de vue économique de nombreux échecs sont à déplorer. Le commerce intra-régionale reste très faible et essentiellement réalisé par des multinationales étrangères ayant investi dans des entreprises locales. Dans le cadre de la négociation APE, les besoins d’intégration sont régulièrement réaffirmés. Il est donc important qu’une réelle intégration (et pas uniquement un TEC, tarrif extérieur commun) se mette en place avant la libéralisation avec l’UE. Pourtant, le calendrier des négociations ne permet pas, à l’heure actuelle, une telle flexibilité.

Une intégration réussie devrait se fonder sur les complémentarités agricoles entre Etats pour mettre en place un réel marché régional intégré des matières premières. La mise en place de ce marché demande des politiques commerciale et agricole régionales cohérentes : protections aux frontières, structuration des filières (mise en place d’un observatoire des marchés par exemple), mobilisation concertée des investissements, etc.

Enfin, il faut noter que la négociation à marche forcée des APE a redynamisé l’intégration régionale au travers (i) de négociations intenses entre les états de la CEDEAO et (ii) d’une très forte mobilisation de la société civile de toute la sous-région qui a porté des messages communs auprès de tous les gouvernements et directement auprès de la CEDEAO.

Note : Dans les négociations APE, et plus généralement pour l’ensemble des PED, les besoins de régulation des Investissements Directs Etrangers (IDE) sont très fortement exprimés par la société civile. Par exemple, le rapatriement des bénéfices doit est contrôlé. En Afrique de l’Ouest cela signifie la mise en place d’une politique sectorielle régionale sur l’investissement avant la négociation APE.

Agrocarburants en Afrique

Un débat autour du développement des agrocarburants est organisé, à l’initiative d’organisations du Nord (IATP, CCFD) et d’organisations panafricaines (ROPPA, ACORD, PELUM). La soixantaine de participants, principalement des africains venus des quatre coins du continent, ont pu initier un débat inédit sur les menaces et opportunités de ces filières émergentes en Afrique, et réagir aux différentes annonces de plans officiels nationaux parfois très ambitieux.

Le manque de consultation des agriculteurs est unanimement souligné. « Tout se fait comme si seuls les gouvernements avaient droit de cité, et devaient dire aux petits paysans ce qu’ils doivent faire ou pas faire », dénonce un délégué béninois (Synergie paysanne), à propos de la récente annonce du Président d’un projet de 250 000 ha porté par une entreprise italienne. Le rôle des grandes entreprises, « véritables bénéficiaires grâce au commerce, tandis que les paysans sont les perdants », est critiquée à plusieurs reprises. La question de la maîtrise du foncier est pointée par un ghanéen : « le problème c’est que nous ouvrons toujours nos terres aux étrangers, alors que nous devrions nous préoccuper de nos intérêts ». « On nous dit : cultivez du jatropha pour dégager des revenus, et vous pourrez acheter les aliments qu’on vous exporte. Mais c’est de la sécurité alimentaire dont l’Afrique a besoin, et nous avons le potentiel ! », s’exclame un éthiopien.

D’autre part, « l’intérêt de la culture du jatropha doit encore être confirmée scientifiquement. Le bilan énergétique est-il vraiment positif ? des cultures à grande échelle ne vont-elles pas épuiser les terres ? » questionne un représentant sénégalais du ROPPA. « Mais si cela était confirmé, notre prochain combat sera d’interdire les exportations d’’huile, pour répondre aux besoins énergétiques des populations ». Un argument appuyé par un représentant paysan de Zambie, où du jatropha est cultivé depuis plus de 20 ans pour des usages domestiques. « Cela ne pose pas de problème car nous n’utilisons que 9% des terres cultivables, mais aussi parce que nous respections un double principe : l’alimentation d’abord, et des aliments pour tous ».

Les délégués africains, membres d’organisations paysannes ou de développement, insistent en effet sur la nécessité de conjuguer le défi alimentaire et les besoins énergétiques, sans céder aux sirènes des filières d’exportation. « Notre faiblesse c’est de ne pas anticiper et faire des choses qui soient bonnes pour nous », reprend le délégué du ROPPA. « Il faut se méfier des fonds étrangers, qui ne signifient pas toujours un meilleur développement, car les bénéfices sont rapatriés », précise la coordinatrice nationale paysanne du Ghana. Un représentant d’ActionAid rappelle également que « l’Afrique doit chercher à optimiser ses alternatives énergétiques, telles que l’hydraulique, l’éolien ou le solaire ».

Par ailleurs, « les organisations européennes doivent plaider pour une suppression de l’objectif d’incorporation de 10% d’agrocarburants dans les transports d’ici 2020, car il induit un recours à l’importation et encourage une pression de la part des entreprises et des gouvernements dans l’accès au foncier en Afrique », précise un délégué français. « Sur la question des APE, la société civile africaine s’est mobilisée trop tard », regrette un membre du ROPPA. « Ne faisons pas la même erreur avec les agrocarburants, faisons un travail de prospective, emparons-nous du débat ! ».

Contact : Ambroise Mazal, a.mazalATccfd.asso.fr

Crédit photo : Damien Lagandré, GRET

JOUR 1

CNUCED XII

Retours sur le rôle de la CNUCED

Créée en 1964, à l’initiative des pays en développement, la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le commerce et le développement (CNUCED) vise à faire bénéficier les PED du commerce mondial. Initialement, cet organe subsidiaire de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies était imaginé comme un instrument de régulation du commerce : il est à l’origine des accords internationaux sur les produits de base et du Système de préférence généralisé, qui est encore aujourd’hui le régime commercial dominant dans les relations entre pays en développement et les pays développés. La CNUCED voit son mandat évoluer dans les années 80 à mesure du renforcement du GATT , pour se concentrer sur trois fonctions principales : recherche et expertise, assistance technique et lieu de débat entre les gouvernements. Traditionnellement, la CNUCED promeut les positions des PED afin de leur faire bénéficier des effets positifs du commerce. Elle se réunit tous les 4 ans pour définir le programme de travail pour les 4 années suivantes.

CNUCED XII

La douzième conférence se réunit dans un contexte particulièrement sensible : les négociations multilatérales du cycle de Doha au sein de l’OMC – dit cycle du développement – patinent, la multiplication des accords de libre échanges régionaux soulève de vives oppositions, et la montée en flèche des prix des matières premières provoque des troubles dans nombre de pays, remettant la sécurité alimentaire au cœur des débats sur le commerce et le développement. Face à ces défis, de nombreux PED souhaitent élargir et renforcer le mandat de la CNUCED. Ils proposent la création de nouvelles commissions de travail sur la mondialisation et le changement climatique et attendent des propositions concrètes. Les pays développés, Etats-Unis en tête, souhaitent a contrario dépolitiser les débats de la CNUCED et recentrer son mandat.

Le rôle de la société civile

Depuis 2004 et la conférence de Sao Paulo, les Etats membres de la CNUCED ont élargi officiellement les débats à la société civile. Ainsi, pendant trois jours en amont de la conférence officielle, le forum de la société civile se réunit afin de préparer un texte de position des ONG qui ouvrira la conférence officielle et de débattre des grands enjeux du commerce pour le développement des PED. Le texte de positionnement final sera présenté à l’ouverture de la Conférence officielle, devant les représentants des Etats membres et le secrétariat de la CNUCED.

C’est dans ce cadre que la plateforme française des ONG de développement, Coordination SUD, est représenté par une délégation de la Commission Agriculture Alimentation, ainsi qu’au sein de la Délégation officielle française. L’objectif de cette représentation est de participer aux débats qui animent pendant trois jours le Théâtre national d’Accra, d’échanger avec les organisations de la société civile du Sud, et de porter la voix de la société civile dans la délégation française dans le sens d’une meilleure régulation des échanges commerciaux internationaux.

Mercredi 17 avril : séance d’ouverture du Forum de la société civile

Lors de la session d’ouverture du Forum, des représentants de la société civile, dont Third World Network Africa, organisateur du forum, ont présenté les grands enjeux de la conférence :

- La crise alimentaire actuelle met en lumière la diminution des marges de manœuvres des Etats et leur capacité à minimiser les dégats. En effet, la libéralisation du commerce, au travers des institutions de Bretton Woods, des négociations OMC et des accords régionaux de libre échange sont considérés comme des freins majeurs à la mise en place des politiques agricoles et commerciales cohérentes. Les négociations des APE et les nouveaux accords de libre échange entre l’UE et les PED (pays andins, ASEAN, etc.) sont particulièrement critiqués à cet égard.

- Les dérives du système financier international sont également considérées comme un des facteurs majeurs pouvant entraver le développement des PED. La crise asiatique due à une libéralisation extravertie des marchés financiers est un exemple symptomatique. La crise des subprimes américaines est un autre exemple d’actualité montrant les impacts des spéculateurs sur l’économie mondiale et donc en premier lieu sur les PED, tout comme la responsabilité des spéculateurs dans la flambée brutale de certains biens alimentaires.

- Enfin, le rôle des multinationales de l’agroalimentaire dans les difficultés rencontrées actuellement par les PED est pointé du doigt. Ces multinationales ultra-concentrées qui contrôlent la fourniture des intrants, la transformation et la commercialisation des produits agricoles font peser sur les paysans et les consommateurs des PED une pression insoutenable : le prix des intrants augmente sans que le prix de vente des producteurs ne suive (malgré une hausse des cours des matières premières). Dans le même temps, les prix aux consommateurs eux sont en pleines croissances.

Face à tous ces défis, la nécessité de régulations est réaffirmée. La CNUCED, bien qu’ayant aujourd’hui un rôle limité dans la régulation des marchés agricoles, commerciaux et financiers, reste une enceinte privilégiée pour faire entendre ces revendications. Une volonté forte a été exprimée pour que la CNUCED puisse formuler des propositions concrètes pour répondre aux défis identifiés.

Notre analyse

- Les thématiques abordées lors de cette session d’ouverture sont cohérentes avec les revendications traditionnelles de la société civile et notamment des acteurs français de la Commission Agriculture et Alimentation.

- Il est cependant intéressant de noter la prédominance des questions liées aux accords régionaux de libre échange (APE en tête) qui monopolisent régulièrement les débats. A contrario, l’absence de sujets relatifs aux négociations à l’OMC dans les débats est particulièrement notable. Les ALE, en allant plus loin que les accords OMC occupent le centre des débats.

- De même, l’urgence de la situation actuelle liée à la croissance des prix alimentaires, bien que présente en toile de fond dans tous les débats, a été peu soulevée. Les conséquences de cette hausse n’ont pas été pas étudiées en tant que telles : les risques et les opportunités de cette nouvelle situation des marchés agricoles sont peu pris en compte.

- Cependant, cette crise alimentaire intervient dans les débats en radicalisant les positions contre la libéralisation des échanges. En séance d’ouverture, la représentante de la société civile sud-américaine a entamé son discours par un appel à la révolution.

Évènements sur place :

17 – 19 avril : sommet de la société civile

20 – 24 avril : Conférence ministérielle de la CNUCED

Contacts CNUCED XII :

- A Accra :

Ambroize Mazal, Chargé de plaidoyer souveraineté alimentaire, CCFD Portable : (0033) 679 443 381 Email : a.mazalATccfd.asso.fr

Damien Lagandré, GRET Tel : 06 23 93 11 62

Benjamin Peyrot des Gachons, Chargé des partenariats, Email : b.desgachonsATpeuples-solidaires.org

Jean-Denis CROLA, Responsable de plaidoyer, Oxfam-France agir ici Email : jdcrolaAToxfamfrance.org Tel : 00233 248 197 176

- A Paris :

Fabrice Ferrier ferrierATcoordinationsud.org : 01 44 72 80 03

Publié dans COMMERCE ET DEVELOPPEMENT | Pas de Commentaire »

L’Internet des Objets : Identification, RFID et Multilinguisme

Posté par BAUDOUIN SCHOMBE le 23 avril 2008

Vendredi 18 avril était organisé par les sociétés SAFRAN et GS1 un colloque sur cette nouvelle révolution numérique qu’est l’Internet des
Objets et dont l’architecture n’est pas sans rapport avec le système DNS de nos noms de domaine.

POINTS ESSENTIELS

• Quelle est la fonction de l’Internet des objets ?
Prolonger l’Internet au monde réel en fixant des étiquettes munies de codes ou d’URLs aux objets ou aux lieux. Ces étiquettes pourront être
lues par un dispositif mobile sans fil et des informations relatives à ces objets et lieux seront retrouvées et affichées.

• Une standardisation sur le modèle du système DNS des noms de domaine :

L’EPC (Electronic Product Code) est un possible standard en la matière et qui repose directement sur le système O.N.S. (Object Naming
Service).

• L’usage des puces RFID:

Les puces RFID à la base de ce système pourront nous informer sur la traçabilité de nos aliments (lieu de l’élevage, quelle alimentation
l’animal à reçu, par quel établissement il est passé etc…), aider à la prévention des feux de forêts, mais aussi améliorer la gestion
d’incidents liés au trafic etc…

Philippe RENARD (Société Française de Terminologie) et accessoirement
à l’origine du mot « logiciel ».

D’après Wikipedia, « l’Internet des objets a pour but de prolonger l’Internet au monde réel en fixant des étiquettes munies de codes ou
d’URLs aux objets ou aux lieux. Ces étiquettes pourront être lues par un dispositif mobile sans fil et des informations relatives à ces
objets et lieux seront retrouvées et affichées. »

Vaste programme abordé lors d’un colloque organisé la semaine dernière par Chantal Lebrument dans les locaux du Groupe SAFRAN. Les nombreux intervenants, dont Pierre Georget, Directeur général de GS1 France et Président de GS1 Europe, Jean-Michel Cornu, Directeur Scientifique FING, Bernard Benhamou, Délégué aux Usages de l’Internet (DUI) ou encore Philippe Renard de la Société Française de Terminologie, ont détaillé cette technologie.

Nécessité d’une standardisation

L’émergence de nouvelles technologies requiert l’usage de standard. L’internet des Objets n’échappe bien évidemment pas à la règle et
Pierre Georget, Directeur général de GS1 France (organisme de  standardisation) a pu saisir l’occasion de présenter l’EPC (Electronic
Product Code), possible standard en la matière et qui repose directement sur le système O.N.S. (Object Naming Service).

Le but de l’EPC est de remplacer nos vieillissants codes-barres ne contenant pas assez d’informations et de créer un langage commun pour
tous. Pour fonctionner, l’EPC nécessite un système global, accessible par tous et partout. Ce système, appelé O.N.S., est directement
inspiré de l’architecture DNS que nous connaissons pour les noms de domaine. Il s’agit en quelques sortes d’un sous-réseau dont l’unique
but est de permettre aux informations propres aux objets de circuler.

Des usages insoupçonnés

La réduction des coûts est l’un des objectifs avoués de cette identification numérique. Elle permet de suivre la chaîne de production dans son intégralité et permet ainsi une rationalisation des coûts (de logistique notamment).

Se restreindre à un aspect purement économique serait pourtant une erreur. Lors de son intervention, Jean-Michel Cornu, Directeur
Scientifique de la FING (Fondation Internet Nouvelle Génération), a donné quelques pistes sur les possibles futurs usages de cet internet
des objets. Les puces RFID notamment utilisé à la base de ce système pourront, outre nous informer sur la traçabilité de nos aliments (lieu
de l’élevage, quelle alimentation l’animal à reçu, par quel établissement il est passé etc…), aider à la prévention des feux de
forêts (poussières intelligentes de capteurs distribuant l’information à un central par exemple), mais aussi améliorer la gestion d’incidents
liés au trafic etc…

Un enjeu majeur

Cependant, le succès de ce nouveau « réseau » reposera sur plusieurs points :

-La miniaturisation et la réduction des coûts pour une intégration plus rapide ;
-Une communication interopérable entre les différents systèmes existants (EPC, NFC – Near Field Communication) ;
-Une autonomie des puces devant être au moins égale à la durée de vie de l’objet ;

Et enfin, une gestion transparente des réseaux impliquant une auto-configuration des objets et des réseaux, mais également la
possibilité de détourner l’usage initial de la puce (par exemple : puce du téléphone permettant de suivre l’état trafic dans un lieu
donné). Les défis sont donc nombreux et Bernard Benhamou, Délégué aux usages de l’Internet (DUI), insiste particulièrement sur la nécessité
de l’implication et des investissements de la France et de l’Europe dans cette nouvelle technologie, avec comme idée sous-jacente de ne
pas reproduire les erreurs du passé sur le développement de l’Internet et l’hégémonie américaine.

Publié le lundi 21 avril 2008
Copyright (c) DomainesInfo. Tous droits réservés. Imprimé le 23/04/2008

Publié dans INTERNET | Pas de Commentaire »

Conseil mondial de l’énergie : « Inga III fournira l’électricité à plusieurs pays d’Afrique en 2020 »

Posté par BAUDOUIN SCHOMBE le 23 avril 2008

RDC | 23 Avril 2008 à 10:31:28

 

Ce projet est au centre d’une rencontre d’experts à Londres, sous les auspices du Conseil mondial de l’énergie (CME). Objectif : fournir de l’électricité dans plusieurs pays d’Afrique d’ici 2020. En clair, avec une puissance estimé à 300 000 gigawatts par an, Inga III peut alimenter l’Afrique du Sud, le Nigeria et l’Egypte. Coût de ce grand projet, 80 milliards USD. Comment le financer et réhabiliter le barrage de Inga? C’est à ces questions et à bien d’autres que répond Gerald Doucet, secrétaire général du Conseil mondial de l’énergie et invité de rédaction de radiookapi.net

 

Radio Okapi : M. Gerald Doucet Bonjour

Gerald Doucet : Bonjour

R O : A quoi fait-on allusion lorsqu’on parle du grand projet Inga au niveau du Conseil mondial de l’énergie ?

G D : Pour nous, il y a d’abord le renouvellement de Inga I et Inga II qui est bien dans les mains de la SNEL (Ndlr : Société nationale d’électricité) et pour lequel il y a le contrat signé avec la Banque mondiale et European Investment bank. Il y a aussi le projet de Inga III dont déjà la compagnie principale est organisée avec des partenaires au Congo, en Angola, en Namibie, au Botswana et en Afrique du Sud. Après tout ça, Grand Inga …, pour lequel actuellement il n’y a pas d’institutions sur place ni d’études de faisabilité. Nous avons beaucoup de choses à faire pour arriver à une décision sur Grand Inga en 2015.

R O : Réaliser ce projet nécessite 80 milliards de dollars américains, sur qui comptez-vous pour le financement ?

G D : Grand Inga , il faut que ce soit plutôt un projet commercial. Bien sûr, les banques comme la Banque mondiale, les banques publiques et les gouvernements seront impliqués. Mais la plupart du financement il faut que ça vienne des sources commerciales, c’est-à-dire qu’il faut organiser ce projet sur un plan de gestion de risques accepté par les marchés.

R O : Vous définissez les axes de distribution de l’énergie notamment à travers l’Afrique du Sud, le Nigeria et l’Egypte. Quels sont les préalables nécessaires au financement pour réaliser ce projet ?

G D : C’est vrai qu’il y a la question d’exporter l’électricité vers l’Angola, la Namibie etc., mais il y est aussi question d’utiliser cette électricité à l’intérieur de la République Démocratique du Congo. Jusqu’au moment où cette question reste ouverte, on n’a pas besoin de considérer les investissements dans la ligne de transmission jusqu’en Afrique du Sud. C’est vrai que l’exportation de l’électricité du Congo de Inga III jusqu’en Afrique du Sud va coûter très cher et en fait va doubler le prix de cette électricité pour les Sud-Africains.

R O : En dépit de ce vaste projet qui concurrence les barrages de trois Gorges de la Chine, le Conseil émet des doutes quant à l’accès réel à l’énergie électrique pour les populations pauvres d’Afrique. Et que faut-il pour que cette énergie profite réellement à ces populations ?

G D : Pour moi, c’est la question clé. Il faut que ce projet soit au profit tout d’abord des citoyens du Congo et des pays voisins. Les pays plus lointains en Afrique comme l’Egypte et le Nigeria, c’est plutôt Grand Inga qui va jouer un rôle. La question principale est d’avancer le projet comme Inga III au profit du citoyen du Congo, Kinshasa bien sûr, Katanga peut-être…., mais s’il reste d’électricité qui n’est pas utilisée, elle sera exportée vers les pays voisins qui sont quand même des partenaires de la SNEL, dans le projet Inga III.

R O : Le Conseil mondial de l’énergie évoque des erreurs commises dans le passé quant à la réalisation d’un tel projet. De quelle nature sont ces erreurs et comment comptez-vous y remédier?

G D : C’est la raison pour laquelle pendant cette rencontre à Londres on a invité les gens de Itaipu au Brésil, parce qu’ils ont investi énormément dans les problèmes de la société civile, dans les problèmes écologiques et de transfert des technologies. On a invité aussi les experts sur le grand projet de la rivière Mékong au Laos et de Gençay au Québec ainsi que ceux de Trois Gorges en Chine. C’est vrai qu’en partie dans ce grand projet on s’est trompé sur les problèmes sociaux, sur les problèmes d’environnement et sur ceux des citoyens de la région proprement dite. Il faut faire en sorte qu’il ait un meilleur accès à l’électricité produite pour les citoyens dans la région de la production. Cela veut dire qu’il faut connecter les villages de la région d’Inga et amener l’électricité dans les grandes villes comme Kinshasa, par exemple. Pour ce, la participation du CME (Conseil mondial de l’énergie) et workshop est basée premièrement sur le principe d’amélioration de l’accès des populations du Congo et des pays voisins à l’électricité.

R O : L’idée de ce projet remonte aux années 80, pensez-vous qu’aujourd’hui le climat politique est propice à sa réalisation ?

G D : Quand j’étais à Kinshasa il y a quelques semaines, vous avez signé des accords de paix [Ndlr : il fait certainement allusion à la signature de l’acte d’engagement de Goma en janvier 2008]. C’est important. Deuxièmement, vous avez signé des accords avec les pays voisins sur le développement du projet Inga III. Et troisièmement, il y a un énorme besoin d’énergie électrique. Au Congo actuellement, il n’y a que 8% de foyers qui bénéficient de l’électricité. Alors, il faut améliorer l’accès à l’électricité, il faut plus que tripler ce chiffre. Et enfin en Afrique du Sud, il y a manque d’électricité. Alors, vous avez de la clientèle non seulement au Congo, mais aussi dans les pays voisins pour l’électricité en question. Ce qui rassure les financiers.

R O : Le début en fait de construction n’est prévu qu’en 2014 et peut-être la mise en exécution concrète entre les années 2020 et 2025. Pensez-vous que le monde aura encore besoin de l’énergie hydroélectrique autant qu’aujourd’hui, en cette période, vu l’émergence d’autres sources d’énergie telles l’énergie nucléaire, l’énergie solaire ou encore l’éolienne ?

G D : L’avantage d’Inga c’est que c’est une électricité qui est moins cher que l’énergie nucléaire et moins polluante que les fulls fossiles. Même avec le nucléaire en Afrique du Sud, on peut vendre l’électricité d’Inga moins cher que l’énergie nucléaire ou celle produite par le charbon. A mon avis, il faut agir maintenant pour réaliser le projet d’Inga III en 2015. Pour ça, il faut des décisions maintenant. C’est pourquoi je retourne à Kinshasa dans les semaines qui viennent pour rencontrer le ministre congolais de l’Energie et le PDG de la SNEL pour avancer sur ce projet ensemble.

R O : Monsieur Gerald Doucet, je vous remercie.

G D : Merci beaucoup et à bientôt.

Par Editeur Web

Publié dans ENERGIE | Pas de Commentaire »

CNUCED XII Jour 4

Posté par BAUDOUIN SCHOMBE le 23 avril 2008

Coordination SUD – Solidarité Urgence Développement
http://coordinationsud.org/spip.php?article5825

 

Coordination SUD et des membres de sa commission Agriculture et Alimentation (CCFD, GRET, Oxfam France-Agir ici, Peuples solidaires) participent à la XIIè conférence ministérielle de la CNUCED qui se tient fin avril à Accra, Ghana.

En direct d’Accra

Jour 4

Dimanche 20 avril : Ouverture officielle de la CNUCED XII

La XIIème CNUCED a été ouverte par le président du Brésil, Lula Da Silva, le président du Ghana, John Kufuor, et le secrétaire général de l’ONU, Ban Ki Moon.

Résumé de l’intervention du Président du Brésil

Dans un premier temps, Lula Da Silva plaide pour le concept « d’espace politique » national, misant sur la responsabilité des gouvernements pour lutter contre la pauvreté (qui doit être distinguée du système de commerce international). Le président du Brésil, qui était l’hôte de la précédente CNUCED, explique que la libéralisation a déjà bénéficié aux PED au travers de la réduction des subventions aux exportations par les pays du Nord, de la diminution du protectionnisme, de l’amélioration de l’accès pour les pays du Sud aux marchés des pays développés…

Il appelle également au développement des échanges Sud – Sud, pour se dégager de la dépendance du Nord.

Cependant, il a également rappelé que les échanges ne sont pas les seules solutions au développement. Il appelle à prendre des mesures concrètes pour les PED :

- Les Pays développés doivent respecter leur engagement pris à Monterrey d’accorder 0,7% de PIB pour l’Aide Publique au Développement.
- Il appel à la création de mécanismes financiers novateurs (à l’image de Unitaid, financé par une taxe sur les vols d’avions)
- L’aide au commerce est particulièrement adaptée aux PED et c’est la CNUCED l’organisme le plus à même de promouvoir et réguler l’aide pour le commerce.
- Enfin, il a clairement plaidé pour le développement des agrocarburants en Afrique car ils permettent de diversifier les exportations des pays du Sud, d’attirer des investissements directs étrangers, et de fournir de l’emploi. Au Brésil, la production d’éthanol aurait diminué la malnutrition.

Les agrocarburants ne sont pas en contradiction avec les objectifs de lutte contre la faim.

Alors que le discours de Kufuor s’est essentiellement cantonné aux messages de bienvenus et au rappel historique du rôle de la CNUCED, le secrétaire général de l’ONU, M Ban Ki Moon a tenu un discours fort sur la crise alimentaire actuelle et ses liens avec la libéralisation des échanges. En effet, après avoir rappelé que le commerce et la mondialisation était à l’origine d’un cercle vertueux de croissance, il a clairement précisé que les risques étaient de plus en plus grands pour le développement car la croissance ne bénéficie pas à tous.

La croissance des prix alimentaires risque, si la crise est mal gérée, d’engendrer des réactions en cascades pouvant aller jusqu’à des déstabilisations politiques. Ces trois dernières années, le monde a consommé plus de produits alimentaires qu’il n’en a produits ! Les solutions à apporter sont dans un premier temps des solutions d’urgence en augmentant le budget du PAM qui va avoir besoin de 750 millions de dollars supplémentaires pour faire face à l’augmentation des prix alimentaires. A moyen et long terme, il prône une révolution verte pour augmenter très fortement les productions agricoles dans les pays du Sud. Pour cela, la Banque Mondiale va augmenter ses prêts à l’agriculture de 400 à 800 millions de dollars d’ici 2009.

Lecture critique du discours de Lula

Babacar Ndao (ROPPA) commente le discours de Lula : « on ne se fait plus d’illusion. Sous couvert d’un discours avant-gardiste il promeut la libéralisation, au bénéfice de son pays qui possède des ressources naturelles et des ressources humaines très importantes ». Deux caractéristiques se dégagent en effet du discours de Lula : d’une part un discours tiers-mondiste virulent contre les injustices, dans lequel il accuse les pays du Nord d’être responsables du sous-développement des pays du Sud (protectionnisme, subventions à leurs producteurs, insuffisance de l’Aide publique au développement,…) ; d’autre part il promeut une plus grande libéralisation des échanges basée sur « la non-discrimination dans les relations commerciales » (règle cardinale de l’OMC), appelant les pays du Sud à se dégager de la dépendance avec le Nord en développant le commerce Sud-Sud.

Le paradoxe entre un discours militant et des pratiques commerciales offensives est évident. Le Président du Brésil semble ainsi vouloir optimiser la puissance commerciale que son pays a acquise au cours de la dernière décennie, à travers les exportations de matières premières agricoles notamment. Il rejoint la Chine et l’Inde dans les puissances émergentes qui se disputent les parts de marché des pays en développement, et de l’Afrique en premier lieu. Coopération et développement humain semblent bien absents…

Jour 3

- Lire la Déclaration des ONG présentes à Accra à l’issue de la consultation de la société civile organisée autour de la CNUCED XII

Lors de la troisième journée du forum de la société civile la déclaration des organisations non gouvernementales a été adoptée en session plénière. Cette déclaration sera présentée lors de la session d’ouverture officielle de la CNUCED XII. Elle a été élaborée tout au long du forum lors de sessions de travail en plénière (télécharger la déclaration en anglais).

Synthèse des tables rondes thématiques :

- La stratégie européenne « Global Europe »

Pourquoi signer un accord commercial bilatéral ou régional avec l’Union européenne (UE) ? Quels bénéfices en tirer ? Ce sont les questions que se sont posées des représentants de la société civile des pays Andins, de l’ASEAN et des pays ACP, trois ensembles en cours de négociation ou ayant négociés des accords commerciaux avec l’Union européenne. L’occasion de prendre du recul sur la mise en oeuvre la stratégie pour « une Europe compétitive dans une économie mondialisée » ou « Global Europe ». Si pour l’Union européenne, les APE ne font pas partie de cette stratégie globale, puisqu’ils sont les seuls à disposer de mesures spécifiques pour encourager le développement, de nombreux points communs ont été mis en avant par les intervenants.

La stratégie « Global Europe » donne toute latitude au Commissaire au Commerce européen pour tenter de signer, avec les pays en voie de développement, des accords commerciaux régionaux et bilatéraux dont le contenu va au-delà des règles imposées par l’OMC : des accords « OMC plus » dans le jargon communautaire. Il a d’ailleurs été rappelé une déclaration de Pascal Lamy, lorsqu’il était encore Commissaire européen au Commerce : « Nous avons toujours recours aux accords commerciaux bilatéraux pour atteindre des objectifs qui vont au-delà des normes établies par l’OMC ».

Voici rapidement les points communs présentés par les intervenants sur ce que l’UE réclame des pays en développement à travers les différents accords abordés :

• Réduction des taxes à l’importation sur les biens industriels et agricoles et suppression des barrières non tarifaires à l’importation • Suppression des restrictions à l’exportation, de matières premières en particulier • Faire respecter des droits de propriété intellectuelle rigides au profit des entreprises européennes • Baisse radicale des réglementations imposées aux entreprises européennes de services • Diminution des réglementations en matière d’investissements effectués par les multinationales européennes • Cesser d’accorder un traitement préférentiel à leurs entreprises lors de la concession de marchés publics

Toutes ces mesures sont par ailleurs négociées avec un agenda très dense et agressif. Bien des points communs, donc, entre les APE et les accords commerciaux signés avec le Mexique, l’Afrique du Sud (avant de l’intégrer dans une région de négociation africaine) ou ceux négociés avec l’ASEAN. Et l’aide européenne est bien souvent mise au service des négociations avec les pays en développement. A ce sujet Martin Khor, secrétaire général de l’organisation Third World Network, a conclu l’atelier par une anecdote intéressante. Lors d’une réunion des négociateurs ACP à Bruxelles avec la Commission européenne à laquelle il était convié pour exposer les enjeux de la négociation des « Questions de Singapour », seule le négociateur des Caraïbes semblait vouloir mettre sur la table la négociation des services et des investissements.

En aparté, il se confie à Martin Khor : l’UE doit financer un important projet de recherche dans la région… et le négociateur craint – peut être à juste titre – que si la région des Caraïbes ne négocie pas ces aspects, les budgets disparaîtront.

Et Martin Khor de conclure : « à l’heure où le sommet sur l’efficacité de l’aide approche… Efficace l’aide ? Pour les négociations européennes, sûrement ! »

En conclusion, il est possible de faire écho au directeur du département économique du ministère des affaires étrangères brésilien, M Carlos, qui considère que le futur de la mondialisation est une fragmentation du système commerciale international en une multitude d’accords plurilatéraux superposés aux règles internes différentes, souvent non compatibles. Cet éclatement du système commercial international ne peut se faire qu’au détriment des pays les plus pauvres qui ont les capacités de négociations les plus faibles.

JOUR 2

CNUCED XII Jour 4 dans COMMERCE ET DEVELOPPEMENT Le Deuxième jour du Forum de la société civile, le 18 Avril, a été marqué par l’intervention du Secrétaire général de la CNUCED Supachai Panitchpakdi, qui a plaidé pour une meilleure intégration des pays du Sud dans les choix de gouvernance locale, et le passage à une « deuxième génération de la mondialisation, qui soit multipolaire ».

Depuis 10 ans qu’il est SG, il pourrait pour la première fois augmenter son personnel, grâce à une augmentation du budget pour laquelle le SG de l’ONU est favorable.

Le SG a exprimé sa préoccupation devant la répétition de certaines crises, « que l’on pourrait tenter d’empêcher ». Son intervention a principalement porté sur la crise alimentaire mondiale actuelle. Il précise trois mesures qui pourraient être mises en œuvre pour assurer la durabilité de l’approvisionnement alimentaire :

- Des mesures immédiates pour aider au transfert des volumes à travers le monde. Les crises sont parfois créées de façon artificielle, et les spéculateurs qui gèlent des stocks pour faire monter les cours ont une responsabilité.

- Une approche intermédiaire (que la CNUCED a exprimée dans ses publications), sur la base du constat que l’agriculture n’occupe que 10% de l’aide au développement (70% va à l’aide sociale). La recherche scientifique est par exemple totalement ignorée : la communauté internationale doit œuvrer à renforcer la productivité agricole. Les infrastructures pour les produits alimentaires, l’irrigation, etc, doivent également être soutenues.

- Sur le long terme, il faut veiller à ce que le commerce ne soit pas un obstacle au développement, et à la production alimentaire par les producteurs locaux. Ceux-ci ne sont pas les bénéficiaires aujourd’hui des prix élevés. Il faut engager le processus pour une révolution verte en Afrique : c’est aussi de choix politiques dont nous avons besoin.

Il a également abordé de manière plus brève les thèmes suivants :

- Les pays de l’OCDE doivent respecter leur engagement sur le niveau de l’APD (0,7 points de PIB)

- La libéralisation du secteur financier doit être régulée (les Hedge Funds notamment)

- L’aide pour le commerce est fondamentale dans le mandat de la CNUCED, qui est l’organe des Nations-Unies le mieux équipé pour réguler cette aide.

- Enfin, il a rappelé l’importance de la CNUCED dans les expertises sur les APE et a appelé les organisations de la société civile à être particulièrement vigilantes sur les questions d’investissements directs étrangers.

Synthèses thématiques des groupes de travail.

Les travaux de la société civile se sont poursuivis durant toute cette deuxième journée au cours des tables rondes.

La régionalisation

Dans quelles mesures l’intégration régionale est une solution à la mondialisation des échanges ? Les nombreuses discussions autours des APE ont largement mis en avant les besoins d’intégration régionale pour assurer le développement économique des ACP. La nécessité de la régionalisation est clairement identifiée étant donné la faible taille des pays ACP et en particulier en Afrique de l’Ouest.

Cependant, l’intégration régionale ne peut être qu’un catalyseur du développement économique. Ce n’est ni une condition nécessaire, ni une condition suffisante au développement. Historiquement, de très nombreuses tentatives d’intégration régionale ont eu lieu ; en règles générales les échecs furent patents. Une explication avancée est celle du manque de consultation et de prise en compte des populations.

L’aspect économique n’est pas suffisant pour promouvoir une intégration régionale en Afrique. De ce point de vue, la situation en Afrique de l’Ouest est particulièrement intéressante. Les pays créés lors de la colonisation ne reposent pas sur des unités sociologiques cohérentes. A contrario, l’Afrique de l’Ouest présente une certaine cohérence sociologique : de nombreuses ethnies sont présentes sur l’ensemble de la sous-région. De plus, avant la colonisation, de grands empires régnaient sur plusieurs pays de la région. En Afrique de l’Ouest, la région a donc un sens pour la population, ce qui rend l’intégration régionale pertinente.

Cependant, depuis la création de la CEDEAO en 1975, le bilan est mitigé. Certaines réussites sont importantes : le passeport CEDEAO permettant la libre circulation des personnes, par exemple. A contrario, du point de vue économique de nombreux échecs sont à déplorer. Le commerce intra-régionale reste très faible et essentiellement réalisé par des multinationales étrangères ayant investi dans des entreprises locales. Dans le cadre de la négociation APE, les besoins d’intégration sont régulièrement réaffirmés. Il est donc important qu’une réelle intégration (et pas uniquement un TEC, tarrif extérieur commun) se mette en place avant la libéralisation avec l’UE. Pourtant, le calendrier des négociations ne permet pas, à l’heure actuelle, une telle flexibilité.

Une intégration réussie devrait se fonder sur les complémentarités agricoles entre Etats pour mettre en place un réel marché régional intégré des matières premières. La mise en place de ce marché demande des politiques commerciale et agricole régionales cohérentes : protections aux frontières, structuration des filières (mise en place d’un observatoire des marchés par exemple), mobilisation concertée des investissements, etc.

Enfin, il faut noter que la négociation à marche forcée des APE a redynamisé l’intégration régionale au travers (i) de négociations intenses entre les états de la CEDEAO et (ii) d’une très forte mobilisation de la société civile de toute la sous-région qui a porté des messages communs auprès de tous les gouvernements et directement auprès de la CEDEAO.

Note : Dans les négociations APE, et plus généralement pour l’ensemble des PED, les besoins de régulation des Investissements Directs Etrangers (IDE) sont très fortement exprimés par la société civile. Par exemple, le rapatriement des bénéfices doit est contrôlé. En Afrique de l’Ouest cela signifie la mise en place d’une politique sectorielle régionale sur l’investissement avant la négociation APE.

Agrocarburants en Afrique

Un débat autour du développement des agrocarburants est organisé, à l’initiative d’organisations du Nord (IATP, CCFD) et d’organisations panafricaines (ROPPA, ACORD, PELUM). La soixantaine de participants, principalement des africains venus des quatre coins du continent, ont pu initier un débat inédit sur les menaces et opportunités de ces filières émergentes en Afrique, et réagir aux différentes annonces de plans officiels nationaux parfois très ambitieux.

Le manque de consultation des agriculteurs est unanimement souligné. « Tout se fait comme si seuls les gouvernements avaient droit de cité, et devaient dire aux petits paysans ce qu’ils doivent faire ou pas faire », dénonce un délégué béninois (Synergie paysanne), à propos de la récente annonce du Président d’un projet de 250 000 ha porté par une entreprise italienne. Le rôle des grandes entreprises, « véritables bénéficiaires grâce au commerce, tandis que les paysans sont les perdants », est critiquée à plusieurs reprises. La question de la maîtrise du foncier est pointée par un ghanéen : « le problème c’est que nous ouvrons toujours nos terres aux étrangers, alors que nous devrions nous préoccuper de nos intérêts ». « On nous dit : cultivez du jatropha pour dégager des revenus, et vous pourrez acheter les aliments qu’on vous exporte. Mais c’est de la sécurité alimentaire dont l’Afrique a besoin, et nous avons le potentiel ! », s’exclame un éthiopien.

D’autre part, « l’intérêt de la culture du jatropha doit encore être confirmée scientifiquement. Le bilan énergétique est-il vraiment positif ? des cultures à grande échelle ne vont-elles pas épuiser les terres ? » questionne un représentant sénégalais du ROPPA. « Mais si cela était confirmé, notre prochain combat sera d’interdire les exportations d’’huile, pour répondre aux besoins énergétiques des populations ». Un argument appuyé par un représentant paysan de Zambie, où du jatropha est cultivé depuis plus de 20 ans pour des usages domestiques. « Cela ne pose pas de problème car nous n’utilisons que 9% des terres cultivables, mais aussi parce que nous respections un double principe : l’alimentation d’abord, et des aliments pour tous ».

Les délégués africains, membres d’organisations paysannes ou de développement, insistent en effet sur la nécessité de conjuguer le défi alimentaire et les besoins énergétiques, sans céder aux sirènes des filières d’exportation. « Notre faiblesse c’est de ne pas anticiper et faire des choses qui soient bonnes pour nous », reprend le délégué du ROPPA. « Il faut se méfier des fonds étrangers, qui ne signifient pas toujours un meilleur développement, car les bénéfices sont rapatriés », précise la coordinatrice nationale paysanne du Ghana. Un représentant d’ActionAid rappelle également que « l’Afrique doit chercher à optimiser ses alternatives énergétiques, telles que l’hydraulique, l’éolien ou le solaire ».

Par ailleurs, « les organisations européennes doivent plaider pour une suppression de l’objectif d’incorporation de 10% d’agrocarburants dans les transports d’ici 2020, car il induit un recours à l’importation et encourage une pression de la part des entreprises et des gouvernements dans l’accès au foncier en Afrique », précise un délégué français. « Sur la question des APE, la société civile africaine s’est mobilisée trop tard », regrette un membre du ROPPA. « Ne faisons pas la même erreur avec les agrocarburants, faisons un travail de prospective, emparons-nous du débat ! ».

Contact : Ambroise Mazal, a.mazalATccfd.asso.fr

Crédit photo : Damien Lagandré, GRET

JOUR 1

CNUCED XII

Retours sur le rôle de la CNUCED

Créée en 1964, à l’initiative des pays en développement, la Conférence des Nations Unies sur le commerce et le développement (CNUCED) vise à faire bénéficier les PED du commerce mondial. Initialement, cet organe subsidiaire de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies était imaginé comme un instrument de régulation du commerce : il est à l’origine des accords internationaux sur les produits de base et du Système de préférence généralisé, qui est encore aujourd’hui le régime commercial dominant dans les relations entre pays en développement et les pays développés. La CNUCED voit son mandat évoluer dans les années 80 à mesure du renforcement du GATT , pour se concentrer sur trois fonctions principales : recherche et expertise, assistance technique et lieu de débat entre les gouvernements. Traditionnellement, la CNUCED promeut les positions des PED afin de leur faire bénéficier des effets positifs du commerce. Elle se réunit tous les 4 ans pour définir le programme de travail pour les 4 années suivantes.

CNUCED XII

La douzième conférence se réunit dans un contexte particulièrement sensible : les négociations multilatérales du cycle de Doha au sein de l’OMC – dit cycle du développement – patinent, la multiplication des accords de libre échanges régionaux soulève de vives oppositions, et la montée en flèche des prix des matières premières provoque des troubles dans nombre de pays, remettant la sécurité alimentaire au cœur des débats sur le commerce et le développement. Face à ces défis, de nombreux PED souhaitent élargir et renforcer le mandat de la CNUCED. Ils proposent la création de nouvelles commissions de travail sur la mondialisation et le changement climatique et attendent des propositions concrètes. Les pays développés, Etats-Unis en tête, souhaitent a contrario dépolitiser les débats de la CNUCED et recentrer son mandat.

Le rôle de la société civile

Depuis 2004 et la conférence de Sao Paulo, les Etats membres de la CNUCED ont élargi officiellement les débats à la société civile. Ainsi, pendant trois jours en amont de la conférence officielle, le forum de la société civile se réunit afin de préparer un texte de position des ONG qui ouvrira la conférence officielle et de débattre des grands enjeux du commerce pour le développement des PED. Le texte de positionnement final sera présenté à l’ouverture de la Conférence officielle, devant les représentants des Etats membres et le secrétariat de la CNUCED.

C’est dans ce cadre que la plateforme française des ONG de développement, Coordination SUD, est représenté par une délégation de la Commission Agriculture Alimentation, ainsi qu’au sein de la Délégation officielle française. L’objectif de cette représentation est de participer aux débats qui animent pendant trois jours le Théâtre national d’Accra, d’échanger avec les organisations de la société civile du Sud, et de porter la voix de la société civile dans la délégation française dans le sens d’une meilleure régulation des échanges commerciaux internationaux.

Mercredi 17 avril : séance d’ouverture du Forum de la société civile

Lors de la session d’ouverture du Forum, des représentants de la société civile, dont Third World Network Africa, organisateur du forum, ont présenté les grands enjeux de la conférence :

- La crise alimentaire actuelle met en lumière la diminution des marges de manœuvres des Etats et leur capacité à minimiser les dégats. En effet, la libéralisation du commerce, au travers des institutions de Bretton Woods, des négociations OMC et des accords régionaux de libre échange sont considérés comme des freins majeurs à la mise en place des politiques agricoles et commerciales cohérentes. Les négociations des APE et les nouveaux accords de libre échange entre l’UE et les PED (pays andins, ASEAN, etc.) sont particulièrement critiqués à cet égard.

- Les dérives du système financier international sont également considérées comme un des facteurs majeurs pouvant entraver le développement des PED. La crise asiatique due à une libéralisation extravertie des marchés financiers est un exemple symptomatique. La crise des subprimes américaines est un autre exemple d’actualité montrant les impacts des spéculateurs sur l’économie mondiale et donc en premier lieu sur les PED, tout comme la responsabilité des spéculateurs dans la flambée brutale de certains biens alimentaires.

- Enfin, le rôle des multinationales de l’agroalimentaire dans les difficultés rencontrées actuellement par les PED est pointé du doigt. Ces multinationales ultra-concentrées qui contrôlent la fourniture des intrants, la transformation et la commercialisation des produits agricoles font peser sur les paysans et les consommateurs des PED une pression insoutenable : le prix des intrants augmente sans que le prix de vente des producteurs ne suive (malgré une hausse des cours des matières premières). Dans le même temps, les prix aux consommateurs eux sont en pleines croissances.

Face à tous ces défis, la nécessité de régulations est réaffirmée. La CNUCED, bien qu’ayant aujourd’hui un rôle limité dans la régulation des marchés agricoles, commerciaux et financiers, reste une enceinte privilégiée pour faire entendre ces revendications. Une volonté forte a été exprimée pour que la CNUCED puisse formuler des propositions concrètes pour répondre aux défis identifiés.

Notre analyse

- Les thématiques abordées lors de cette session d’ouverture sont cohérentes avec les revendications traditionnelles de la société civile et notamment des acteurs français de la Commission Agriculture et Alimentation.

- Il est cependant intéressant de noter la prédominance des questions liées aux accords régionaux de libre échange (APE en tête) qui monopolisent régulièrement les débats. A contrario, l’absence de sujets relatifs aux négociations à l’OMC dans les débats est particulièrement notable. Les ALE, en allant plus loin que les accords OMC occupent le centre des débats.

- De même, l’urgence de la situation actuelle liée à la croissance des prix alimentaires, bien que présente en toile de fond dans tous les débats, a été peu soulevée. Les conséquences de cette hausse n’ont pas été pas étudiées en tant que telles : les risques et les opportunités de cette nouvelle situation des marchés agricoles sont peu pris en compte.

- Cependant, cette crise alimentaire intervient dans les débats en radicalisant les positions contre la libéralisation des échanges. En séance d’ouverture, la représentante de la société civile sud-américaine a entamé son discours par un appel à la révolution.

Évènements sur place :

17 – 19 avril : sommet de la société civile

20 – 24 avril : Conférence ministérielle de la CNUCED

Contacts CNUCED XII :

- A Accra :

Ambroize Mazal, Chargé de plaidoyer souveraineté alimentaire, CCFD Portable : (0033) 679 443 381 Email : a.mazalATccfd.asso.fr

Damien Lagandré, GRET Tel : 06 23 93 11 62

Benjamin Peyrot des Gachons, Chargé des partenariats, Email : b.desgachonsATpeuples-solidaires.org

Jean-Denis CROLA, Responsable de plaidoyer, Oxfam-France agir ici Email : jdcrolaAToxfamfrance.org Tel : 00233 248 197 176

- A Paris :

Fabrice Ferrier ferrierATcoordinationsud.org : 01 44 72 80 03
Pour vous désabonner, un simple mail suffit : bayou@coordinationsud.org

Publié dans COMMERCE ET DEVELOPPEMENT | Pas de Commentaire »

Au rendez-vous de la 12e Cnuced à Accra (Ghana)

Posté par BAUDOUIN SCHOMBE le 23 avril 2008

Bulletin électronique quotidien publié par l’Institut Panos Afrique de l’Ouest, à l’occasion de la réunion de la 12e Cnuced au Ghana, du 20 au 25 avril 2008.
==============================

========================

Le bulletin électronique que l’Institut Panos Afrique de l’Ouest diffuse régulièrement, à l’occasion d’importants événements impliquant les organisations de la société civile, vous revient. Ce sommet se tient à un moment où le fonctionnement du commerce international est sujet à de multiples interrogations. Plutôt que des relations harmonieuses, il se développe deux pôles antagoniques, entre un Nord qui s’enrichit et accumule et un Sud qui s’enfonce dans la pauvreté malgré l’exploitation de ses ressources.
Le thème de cette 12e Cnuced porte sur «Perspectives et enjeux de la globalisation pour le développement». Les dérèglements actuels du commerce mondial et la hausse continue des prix que connaissent les pays africains le rendent opportun, tout comme le contexte actuel de blocage et d’incertitudes dans lequel se trouve le processus de négociation des Accords de partenariat économique (Ape)
A l’occasion de la 12e Cnuced qui se tient au Ghana du 20 au 25 avril, les Osc se sont retrouvées dans un Forum préparatoire qui s’est tenu du 17 au 19 avril. Entre plénières, panels et conférences, ses représentants ont fait un état des lieux, posé le débat sur les urgences de l’heure et ouvert des alternatives. Leurs réflexions vont être portées au niveau de la conférence et les débats se poursuivre tout au long de cette semaine.
Africabeat@Accra se propose de vous en rendre compte chaque jour.

AFRIQUE
Les failles de l’intégration régionale

Le Japon et la Chine ont vécu leur évolution industrielle sans s’insérer dans un cadre d’intégration. Pourquoi ce processus est-il alors imposé comme une conditionnalité dans le développement de l’Afrique ? Toutefois, quand ils font ce parallèle par rapport à ces géants d’Asie, Bakary Fofana, directeur du Centre du Commerce International pour le Développement (CECIDE – Guinée) et Cheikh Tidiane Dièye, coordonnateur du programme Commerce et négociations commerciales à ENDA, ne s’embarquent pas dans une comparaison aveugle. Le pays de l’Afrique de l’Ouest ne sont pas la Chine ou le Japon. Et leur intégration se pose aujourd’hui comme une voie de salut. Mais une «intégration vraie». Un espace que les plus leaders politiques n’utilisent pas pour la propagande, mais une intégration des peuples et des économies. Et aujourd’hui, confie Bakary Fofana, «le processus d’intégration régional reflète une approche liée plus à l’agenda économique qu’à l’intégration des politiques et des populations».
M. Dièye et Fofana ont animé un panel dans le cadre du Forum de la société civile, le 18 avril.

AIDE AU DEVELOPPEMENT
Donner des repères à la société civile

La nature de l’aide et l’utilisation qui est en faite. Deux élements au centre des débats, au cours d’un atelier de Cuts international, une Ong qui milite pour que l’aide bénéficie mieux à ses destinataires. C’était le 18 avril, dans le cadre du Forum social. Une occasion pour reposer les questions sur l’efficience de l’aide accordée aux pays pauvres. Les appuis techniques et financiers sont-ils orientés aux bons endroits ? Les donateurs n’agissent-ils pas uniquement pour se donner bonne conscience ? Ne donnent-ils pas d’une main pour reprendre de l’autre ? Dans les pays pauvres bénéficiaires, l’aide n’est-elle utilisée à mauvais escient ? Les ressources financières n’atterrissent-elles pas dans les poches des dirigeants ? Après quelques tours d’horloge, les réponses se sont succédé sur un ton affirmatif.
Que faut-il faire pour inverser la tendance ? David Luke du Programme des Nations unies pour le développement (Pnud), ouvre la piste d’une plus grande formation à l’absorption de l’aide. « Il arrive que les compétences nationales manquent pour élaborer des projets afin d’absorber les ressources financières disponibles pour l’aide», fait-il remarquer. Le directeur du Commerce international du ministère indien du Commerce et de l’Industrie opine, mais ajoute que la bonne réponse est celle qui aide à se passer de l’aide. A ce propos, note de R. S. Ratna, l’Inde a une expérience à partager, qui porte sur la formation académique des futurs cadres des pays en développement.

COMMERCE MONDIAL
Des acteurs de la société civile appellent à un cadre plus «humain»

Différents acteurs de la société civile présents à cette 12e session de la Cnuced estiment qu’il faut désormais «humaniser» le commerce international afin de permettre aux pays producteurs des produits de base de sortir de la misère et de la pauvreté dans lesquelles ils se retrouvent.
«Les pays qui produisent les produits de bases sont toujours les plus pauvre » déplore Adalbert Nouga, administrateur de Village Suisse Ong (VSONG) basé en Suisse et qui a des représentations en Afrique. Pour lui, « Il faut que la Cnuced, dans sa nouvelle politique, mette l’homme au centre de toute activité commerciale ». Un avis partagé par Elvis Agbayizato de l’Ong Challenge International basée au Togo. « Il faut humaniser le commerce international en évitant de créer des accords de libre échange qui permettent aux plus forts de marcher sur les plus faibles. Le profit doit être redistribué pour permettre aux producteurs d’avoir les fruits de leurs efforts», pense Agbayizato.

MME NICOLE OKALA BILAÏ
Maire de Mbangassina au Cameroun.

«Apprenons à nos enfants à faire du chocolat»
Réagissant à une question sur la place de l’Afrique dans le commerce mondiale, Mme Nicole Okala Bilaï, Maire de Mbangassina au Cameroun, présidente de l’Ong Nature et environnement, confie :
«Nous savons que les multinationales ne nous laisseront jamais un iota de terrain. Il nous appartient de repenser nous-mêmes nos politiques. Je prends l’exemple de la commune rurale et agricole de Mbangassina, dont je suis le maire. Nous produisons énormément de produits, dont le cacao. Toute cette production va à l’exportation, mais puisque nous ne maîtrisons pas les prix qui nous sont imposés de l’extérieur, il nous appartient donc de repenser les choses. On pourrait développer de petites unités de transformation dans nos villages. Pourquoi ne pas, aujourd’hui, envoyer nos enfants apprendre à faire du chocolat ? Pourquoi le manioc qui est aujourd’hui l’un de nos principaux produits de consommation ne devrait pas être transformé dans de petites usines dans nos villages pour faire du gari, du couscous ? Certes, on le fait d’une façon artisanale, mais il faut que nos politiques, nos gouvernants aillent au-delà avec ces produits qui peuvent être exportés et rapporter de l’argent à nos paysans.
J’ai été élue maire au mois de juillet, vous pensez bien que mon combat se trouve là. Parce qu’il n’est pas normal, au 21e siècle, qu’on soit encore courbé sur une houe dans nos campagnes pour cultiver un petit lopin de terre et se détruire la colonne vertébrale.»

PANEL DU ROPPA
«L’Afrique a abandonné ses paysans »

«Il est incompréhensible que dans des pays où 40% du Pib provient de l’agriculture, on ne puisse pas mettre de côté 10 à 15% du budget pour soutenir les paysans. Les ministres de l’Economie et des Finances de nos pays ont refusé cette proposition». A partir de là, note Cheikh Mouhamady Cissoko, président du Réseau des organisations paysannes et des poducteurs d’Afrique (Roppa), il est devenu constant que les paysans ne doivent compter que sur eux-mêmes en constituant une force de pression. Le panel d’échanges organisé lundi s’inscrivait dans cette dynamique de recherche de solutions.
«Les paysans sont majoritaires. Comme électeurs, ils sont les plus nombreux. Comme consommateurs, ils sont les plus nombreux. Donc on est capable de renverser la tendance. Les autorités politiques sont à l’écoute des pressions. Il faut donc faire pression. Si on ne fait pas pression, rien ne sera fait.» Cette pression, c’est pour asseoir la souveraineté alimentaire et comprendre que le droit à l’alimentation fait partie de la dignité humaine.

Coordinateur : Tidiane Kassé
Rédaction : Zéguéla Bagayoko (Côte d’Ivoire), Ousseini Issa (Niger), Lyndon Ponnie (Liberia), Mustapha Suleiman (Ghana), Noël Tadégnon (Togo), Bréhima Touré (Mali), Hippolyte Djiwan (Bénin)
• Vous pouvez lire l’intégralité de ces articles sur le site de Flamme d’Afrique : http://flamme.panos-ao.org

Publié dans COMMERCE ET DEVELOPPEMENT | Pas de Commentaire »

Civil Society Forum Declaration to UNCTAD XII

Posté par BAUDOUIN SCHOMBE le 23 avril 2008

Poverty anywhere constitutes a danger to prosperity everywhere”
(Declaration of Philadelphia, International Labour Organization, 1944)
Civil Society Forum
1. The Civil Society Forum, meeting on the occasion of UNCTAD XII (20–25 April 2008), took place in Accra, Ghana, from 17 to 19 April 2008. It brought together social movements, pro-development groups, women’s groups, trade unions, peasants and agricultural organizations, environmental organizations, faith-based organizations and fair trade organizations (referred to as We thereafter), which expressed a variety of perspectives on trade, investment and competition policies and their impacts on development. Forum participants were united in the defence of a number of principles, positions and actions they wished to present to the member States of the United Nations Trade and Development Conference at its twelfth session.
I. Global context
2. The era of globalization is proving to be a time of persistent and growing inequalities. Current neoliberal policies are far from neutral. World trade growth has been accompanied by the dislocation of the poorest societies, including least developing countries (LDCs), and the continued suffering of the most vulnerable groups, particularly hundreds of millions of women.

3. UNCTAD XII is taking place at a critical juncture for the global economy and multilateral system. The looming recession, volatile food and commodity prices and the credit crunch that are part of the backdrop to UNCTAD XII are all manifestations of a dysfunctional global system.
4. The opposite poles of wealth and poverty reinforce each other with every new manifestation of the flaws of the system. The most notable problems today are, first, the massive losses (now estimated by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) at almost US$1 trillion) arising from the global financial crisis, and, second, the world crisis of rising food prices and food shortages.

5. We want Governments and UNCTAD XII to take action now on these two fronts. Financial institutions and speculation must be regulated, along with the global financial system that promotes the unregulated flow of capital, particularly speculative funds and activities. The UNCTAD secretariat has done great work on finance. If the international community had followed its advice, there might not have been such a crisis today. UNCTAD XII must mandate the Organization to expand its work on finance, including how developing countries would be affected by the fallout of the financial crisis, what they can do about it, and how to overhaul the global financial architecture. The objective should be to ensure that finance serves development, not the greed of speculators. The goals of development include decent work, full employment, adequate income, environmental sustainability and gender equality.

6. The food crisis is mainly caused by a mismatch of supply and demand. Another reason is the shift from producing food to biofuels, a trend which should be reviewed and reversed. But another reason is that developing countries were wrongly pressured by the loan conditionalities of the World Bank and IMF to cut Government subsidies, support to small farmers, and food import duties. At the same time, high agricultural subsidies continue in rich countries. Local farmers, who have been submerged by cheap, subsidized exports, have livelihood problems.

7. The food crisis makes policy change necessary. Developing countries must be allowed to defend their food security and small farmers, so as to quickly expand food production through sustainable agriculture and raise tariffs in order to prevent import surges. Developed countries must quickly phase out their trade-distorting subsidies, including those within the so-called Green Box subsidies. Land set aside for biofuel production should be reclaimed for farming. There must be changes to policies at the World Bank, the IMF and the World Trade Organization (WTO) and to free trade agreements (FTAs), including economic partnership agreements (EPAs). UNCTAD can play a central role in this reform, helping to find the right solutions to the food crisis.

8. A major achievement of UNCTAD XI was to recognize the importance of policy space for developing countries. However, policy space for government intervention and regulation has shrunk further since then. In particular, this has been caused by loan conditionalities and existing WTO rules, as well as substantial increases in bilateral and regional free trade agreements. These agreements lock developing countries into inappropriate liberalization of imported goods and services and unsuitable intellectual property rights (IPR) policies. The FTAs and EPAs also introduce new rules on liberalizing investment and government procurement that go beyond WTO commitments, eroding Governments’ ability to regulate for development and for the public welfare.

9. This erosion of policy space remains the main issue, especially since this loss of policy space also poses a threat to the ability of developing countries to deal with the finance and food crises.
10. Consequently, our principal demand is that UNCTAD XII deal even more forcefully with the issue of policy space. UNCTAD – both the Secretariat and the inter-governmental machinery – must be given an expanded mandate to empower developing countries with the use of policy tools for development.

 

11. As a result of orthodox policy prescriptions, the policy space to exercise governmental intervention and regulation by developing countries has diminished. While developed countries ensure they retain sufficient possibilities for national policy intervention, the needed range of policy options is not available to developing countries. Over the last decades, as part of structural adjustment programmes (SAPs) as well as WTO and bilateral North–South trade negotiations, developing countries have given up substantial policy space, resulting in an inabilityto respond adequately to economic instabilities and social emergencies andimpeding long-term development.
12. The increasing number and expanding scope of bilateral and regional North–
South agreements that go beyond WTO commitments and ruthlessly promote the
North’s corporate agenda constitute a grave danger for democracy, development and
social solidarity at local, national and international levels, as most of these North–
South FTAs, including EPAs, drastically erode the policy space required for
economic and social development. The international rules and conditionalities
imposed on developing country governments not only limit their ability to choose
and implement appropriate development policies but also hinder genuine dialogue
with citizens and civil society, since policymakers believe they are constrained to
follow the policies laid down through institutions such as the World Bank, IMF and
regional banks and through trade agreements.
13. Developing countries face continuous pressures to liberalize their imports,
even though local industries and agricultural sectors in many countries have been
hamstrung by cheap imports. In many poor countries, the dumping of subsidized
farm exports from the North onto world markets continues to destroy rural
livelihoods. Many LDCs, especially in Africa, have seen their local industries close
or lose their share of the local market due to import liberalization imposed by the
World Bank, IMF and regional development banks. The EPAs negotiated with the
European Union will cause a new wave of economic dislocation in the Africa,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries.
14. At WTO, the Doha negotiations have so far produced very imbalanced draft
proposals. Developed countries can continue their high agricultural subsidies
through shifting of the boxes or categories of subsidies because many of the so-
called non-trade-distorting Green Box subsidies have been found in reality to be
trade distorting (and to adversely affect quality production and exports of
developing countries), but proposals to improve disciplines to limit these subsidies
are weak and grossly inadequate. Yet while the North maintains its subsidies,
developing countries are pressured to cut their agricultural tariffs further by an
average 36 per cent (which is more than the 24 per cent in the Uruguay Round),
making them even more vulnerable to import surges and consequent rural
dislocation.
15. In the negotiations on industrial goods, the “Swiss formula”, never before
used, will slash tariffs for industrial goods in developing countries, damaging or
even destroying many local industries. LDCs do not have to reduce their tariffs
through the Doha Round, but most of them may also be affected by deep tariff cuts
through other mechanisms, including bilateral agreements like the EPAs, and further
loan conditionalities. Meanwhile, developed countries not only maintain their
agricultural subsidies but also plan to protect their important agricultural products
from tariff cuts through various mechanisms, and are only prepared to cut their
industrial tariffs by lower rates than developing countries under the “Swiss
formula”. Non-tariff barriers are increasingly used to block market access for
products from developing countries. The Doha deal is turning out to work against
the developing countries, although it was intended to be a Development Round.
16. Furthermore, developed countries are pushing for liberalization of services
through regional and multilateral trade agreements. Strategic sectors such as finance
and telecommunications may well end up dominated by foreign firms. In addition,
the role of the State in providing public services may be further threatened.
17. Access to social services is also threatened by intellectual property regimes
that limit access to medicines and information. In particular, women’s access to health care, information and education is affected, further denying their empowerment and undermining their efforts to participate in political and public activities and ensure a sustainable livelihood.

18. Despite the dangers of climate change, unsustainable levels and patterns of production and consumption continue to prevail in the industrialized countries, accelerating the endangerment of and stress to global natural resources. The North continues to incur an ecological debt to the South, but developing countries still come under pressure to allow exploitation of natural resources by multinational enterprises (MNEs).

19. The right to regulate and inclusiveness in decision-making processes, both nationally and internationally, are in danger. Social dialogue is weakened by structural adjustment policies. Social and economic rights, and labour and trade union rights, including freedom of association and non-discrimination, are weakened, not guaranteed by the globalization of production methods.

20. Although there is a prevalent idea that greater foreign direct investment (FDI) is the main development option for developing countries; in reality, FDI results in more costs and losses in many cases. In many countries, it exacerbates the outflow of resources, including investment resources, from these countries and the acute imbalance that arises in the global economy. Moreover, Africa, the poorest continent in the world, is a net exporter of capital, even while the burden of its external (and internal) debt continues to crush development possibilities and aspirations year after year. Domestic resource mobilization is seriously hampered by imbalanced resource flows, especially capital flight.

21. The benefits of globalization remain in the hands of a few. Development promises made by the economic export-led model and by import liberalization remain unmet in most countries. Even though prices have increased recently, the benefits of commodity production have been limited for commodity producers, as a result of the scant domestic value added to commodities and the concentration of control of much of the value chain in the hands of MNEs and others.

22. Increasing economic integration of many developing countries in the world economy has not addressed the development concerns of their populations. The need for decent and productive employment has not been met by current models of development, as unemployment and underemployment remain unacceptably high.

23. Another example is the irony of “jobless growth”, accentuated by the dislocation and expulsion of tens of millions from production activities and alternative non-market socio-economic micro-systems that have historically maintained some access to life resources for some of the most vulnerable in developing countries. What has been described as the “commodification of the commons”, together with the spread of market-driven commodity chains and attendant property forms over natural resources, is imposing unprecedented labour intensity and precarious “flexibilization” and “casualization” on a minority lucky to hold on to steady employment in the formal sector and forced to share resources, as well as compete, with a vast sea of dispossessed human capacity.

24. We reaffirm that employment is the key to poverty eradication, but this implies the inclusion of full and productive employment and decent work in agriculture, services and industrialization as the main goal in policymaking and requires trade policies and financial policies that are consistent with this objective. UNCTAD should incorporate into its activities the commitment to decent work which was adopted by all United Nations member States at the 2005 World Summit of the United Nations General Assembly and reaffirmed in the 2006 Ministerial Declaration of the United Nations Economic and Social Council.

25. As the dominant models have failed to ensure social welfare, there is a need to explore alternative diverse and participatory economic systems that are adapted to local and national realities, while also prioritizing and protecting equity, democracy and diversity, human rights, labour rights, ecology, food security and sustainable production and consumption.

II. Specific issues by sub-theme

A. Sub-theme 1: Enhancing coherence at all levels for sustainable economic development and poverty reduction in global policymaking, including the contribution of regional approaches

26. A major challenge in the discussion on coherence is the different interpretations of coherence. For States in developed countries, the main view of coherence is the harmonization of policies that guarantee more markets and profits for their companies. For civil society, coherence means that policies should aim to promote poverty eradication, social equity, gender equity and social development; increase employment; and ensure the livelihoods of farmers and the process of industrialization through sustainable development.

27. The Bretton Woods institutions and the most powerful member States within WTO currently consider coherence to be the harmonization of national policies, in order to ensure that these do not conflict with the prevailing international neoliberal economic order. On this assumption, structural adjustment programmes, poverty reduction strategy papers, bilateral and multilateral trade and investment rules, underpinned by the aid regime, all demand that developing countries, LDCs and countries in transition tailor their economic policies to fit a corporate-driven model.

28. For the ordinary citizens of the world and for civil society organizations, however, coherence means, as stated in the Sao Paulo Consensus, that international economic policies must address the needs of all people. To achieve such an objective, autonomous, sovereign, and participatory development priorities must be the entry point and chief determinant of negotiations and obligations involving these countries in institutions of economic governance. Furthermore, the Governments of developing countries and LDCs and democratically elected politicians must be much more strongly represented in the decision-making processes of these institutions.

29. The lack of representation of developing countries in global governance results in top-down development approaches and policies, while maintaining a disconnect between decision-making centres and recipient countries and their peoples.

30. “Coherence” around the wrong principles and measures, which now prevails, has led to the wrong outcomes. Many North–South regional and bilateral trade agreements are used to promote the wrong kind of coherence. They make developing countries enter into undertakings that go beyond WTO commitments and include issues such as investment and government procurement that were rejected at WTO. They significantly erode whatever policy space exists in developing countries, in addition to undermining the prospects for South–South cooperation and regional integration.

31. An additional problem is the use of the so-called “development aspect” of trade agreements such as EPAs, which is used as “bait” by developed country parties to draw developing countries into the main aspects of FTAs or EPAs that are detrimental to development.

32. UNCTAD should take note of the above dangers and wrong manifestations of “coherence”, striving towards policy coherence that is appropriate, in which all policy advice, measures and agreements are focused and geared to the development of developing countries.

33. UNCTAD XII must be based on a radically different form of “coherence”: a reorientation and integration of policies that ensure that the international economic order is adjusted to meet the development needs of the groups most affected by corporate-driven globalization.

B. Sub-theme 2: Key trade and development issues and the new realities in the geography of the world economy

34. The debate on the link between trade and development is ongoing. The orthodox position is that trade and the dominant trade policy are positive for development. However, a majority of developing countries have suffered from inappropriate import liberalization while gaining little from exports. Their local industries and agriculture have been stifled by cheap imports, with loss of farm livelihoods and industrial jobs.

35. The one-size-fits-all approach to economic and trade policymaking does not work and results in wrong policies and great cost to many developing countries and their people. Contrary to the prevailing view of the international financial institutions, the road to sustainable development is not the same for everyone.

36. North–South FTAs including EPAs, mainly promote the North’s corporate agenda and pose a grave threat to developing countries. UNCTAD’s Trade and Development Report 2007 was valuable for highlighting the cost and benefits of North–South FTAs, and the Organization must continue to focus on this.

37. We stress the need for immediate rectification of the wrong policies of World Bank and IMF and recently of the EPAs and FTAs. As for the EPAs, the European Union should stop pressuring the ACP countries to conclude them. An alternative to EPAs should be found, with the non-reciprocal principle at the centre of the trade aspect, which also does not contain the issues of services, intellectual property rights (IPRs), investment and government procurement.

38. African civil society, backed by European civil society, has been campaigning against the EPAs and their framework while advocating alternative approaches the retain preferences for ACP countries without an obligation for them to liberalize their goods imports on a reciprocal basis. In addition, it wishes to exclude other issues such as services, IPRs, investment, competition and government procurement. It is largely felt that the EPAs were signed not as an instrument for delivering development in ACP countries but out of fear that if access to the EU market was not preserved, some of their trade would be disrupted. There should be a renegotiation of those EPAs that have been already negotiated and a review in other countries that have not yet signed the EPAs, allowing civil society to assess the full implications so that informed decisions (including opting for alternatives to the EPAs) can be made without pressure.

39. At WTO, the latest proposals on the Doha negotiations, if adopted, would have a deeply imbalanced outcome, with developed countries continuing to maintain high agricultural subsidies while reducing their industrial tariffs at rates lower than developing countries undertaking the “Swiss formula” cuts. Developing countries would have to make deeper tariff cuts in industrial and agricultural goods. Many of the poorer countries, which may not undertake tariff cuts through the Doha negotiations, would have to do so under the EPAs.

40. Global trade rules must recognize the vital role for Governments in regulation and thus preserve or expand policy space so that each country can plan and manage its own economic development as well as mitigate the risks associated with the volatilities arising from integration of markets.

41. The use of conditionalities in loans and aid has often resulted in inappropriate trade and investment policies in many developing countries.

42. Commodity-dependent developing countries are confronted with complex problems ranging from price volatility to corporate concentration. UNCTAD XII should provide practical solutions such as price-stabilizing mechanisms and regulation of corporate activities. An expanded commodity programme for UNCTAD is needed.

43. Developing countries also face increasing non-tariff barriers (NTBs) to their products in developed countries. A major problem is the use of unilateral measures. While safety and technical regulations are needed, they are also prone to be used for protectionist purposes. Moreover, most developing countries lack the capacity to keep up with increasing standards in developed country markets. Developed countries should not make use of unilateral, protectionist measures. Proper international standards should be established and developing countries must be assisted in negotiating and implementing those standards. UNCTAD should work on NTBs and assist developing countries in that regard.

44. South–South cooperation offers the potential for partnerships among developing countries that can be mutually beneficial. A few countries have experienced sustained high rates of growth, and this has assisted other countries through higher demand for their commodity exports. However, it is not certain that this process will be sustained, especially if there is a global recession. Consequently, concrete measures must be taken to strengthen and institutionalize South–South cooperation. There is a need to strengthen the General System of Trade Preferences (GSTP) mechanism in order to achieve tangible concrete results. However, steps must be taken to ensure that within South–South agreements, weaker partners are accorded special and differential treatment, including sufficient incentives and preferences, and are not asked to undertake liberalization or implement policies that make them vulnerable to negative effects. UNCTAD should also play a role in promoting and assessing South–South cooperation and integration processes.C. Sub-theme 3: Enhancing the enabling environment at all levels to strengthen productive capacity, trade and investment: mobilizing resources and harnessing knowledge for development

45. Investment and investment flows do not behave in the manner claimed by those who try to justify globalization of finance, trade and production. The share of resources going into new productive investments has declined relative to the share going to financial and speculative ventures. Africa remains a net exporter of capital due to capital flight, even as it is dependent on foreign investment and aid flows.

46. In cases where developing countries have succeeded in attracting and using investment, the factors for their success include appropriate regulation, strategic direction and a direct if selective role for the State in the economy. In poorer countries, there is a lack of domestic private investment.

47. There are benefits and costs to foreign investment in developing countries. While benefits are often exaggerated, costs are often not overlooked or left out of policy decisions. Developing countries should take a holistic view and design policy on the basis of assessments of costs and benefits, with the help of UNCTAD. In that context, what is also important are the terms of the contract between the State and the foreign investors. UNCTAD should help developing countries to improve those terms so as to increase their benefits. Also, the terms for foreign investment must be such that they do not affect the sovereignty of developing countries by limiting their policy space. Any international framework on investment should promote the rights and interests of host developing countries and ensure their policy space to regulate investments for the national and public interest. UNCTAD should also research successful experiences of developing countries that have negotiated good terms in foreign investment contracts and disseminate those experiences.

48. Of major significance for successful development is the revival of the developmental State or a democratic State that develops and sustains the capacities of decision-makers and institutions to plan and navigate the necessary strategic course, based on an autonomous and endogenous agenda whose content has been determined by, and is an expression of, democratic political consensus for integrated and balanced development.

49. UNCTAD should counterbalance many of the instruments of the World Bank, OECD and donor agencies that lead to reforms of national investment and business laws which are designed to benefit foreign investors but which erode or remove people’s rights and restrict the policy space of Governments and parliamentarians.

50. Investment agreements often put the burden of costs on Governments and their populations while leaving multinational enterprises (MNEs) free of any responsibility. In some cases, those agreements include dispute settlement systems that allow a MNE to sue its host government for compensation. The new FTAs, including EPAs, incorporate new investment liberalization with many new restrictions preventing Governments from regulating activities. Countries should review their investment policies that place investors’ rights above the rights of citizens. Withdrawing from bilateral investment treaties in favour of more balanced ones, as some developing countries have begun to do, is an option.

D. Sub-theme 4: Strengthening UNCTAD: enhancing its development role, impact and institutional effectiveness

51. We believe UNCTAD has a unique role, especially in these uncertain times. Its function as a support to developing countries in development issues and processes must be expanded.

52. UNCTAD was mandated by UNCTAD XI to establish a task force on commodities. This has yet to be operationalized, and the Organization should be enabled to do so as soon as possible.

53. UNCTAD’s work on commodities should be expanded with a view to helping developing countries boost food production; obtain better value for their commodities; and add value to their raw materials through processing and manufacturing. UNCTAD’s expanded efforts with regard to commodities should include finding solutions at the international and national levels and combining both old and innovative approaches in order to ensure that the current boom in commodity prices leads to sustainable development and diversification of developing countries. Activities can focus on helping developing countries benefit from the opportunities arising from rising commodity prices as well as avoiding and containing the negative consequences of falling commodity prices when they do fall.

54. UNCTAD should also continue its efforts to analyse the development implications of North–South FTAs, following up on the Trade and Development Report 2007 which highlighted the imbalances in such agreements. Its work in this area and on bilateral investment agreements should be guided by the developmentperspective.

55. UNCTAD should rethink its investment policy advice. It should help stop the“race to the bottom” regarding incentives for investments, including tax holidays. Itshould provide analysis on costs and benefits of foreign investment, and advice onpolicies to maximize benefits while minimizing costs. It should also analyse ingreater depth the development implications of bilateral investment treaties, as wellas investment chapters and proposals in FTAs.

56. Independent research and alternative policy formulation by the UNCTADsecretariat are necessary. UNCTAD must continue to develop and provide analysisand support in this respect, and should be given the means to provide analysis andpolicy advice to developing countries.

57. The UNCTAD secretariat must be allowed to continue its research in anindependent manner so that it can produce objective research aimed at supportingthe development goals of developing countries, thereby adding to the diversity ofviews among the international agencies.

58. UNCTAD’s research work makes an important contribution to knowledgeabout trade and development issues and has contributed historically to the definitionof new trends. It is important that UNCTAD maintain its research independence. Weurge member States to provide UNCTAD with the means to continue its independentresearch and call on the management of UNCTAD to strive to improve thedissemination of the Organization’s research work and publications.

59. UNCTAD needs to expand its research to include analysis of tradeliberalization proposals and their impact on the quantity and quality of employment.

60. With a rising world population, changing climate conditions and new demandsfor agriculture products, agriculture’s role is swiftly evolving, posing a majorchallenge for sustainable development in coming years. UNCTAD will need to helpdeveloping countries identify the best policies for sustainable agriculture to dealwith these new challenges.

61. UNCTAD should study the policy options for developing countries forindustrialization, bearing in mind the changing world conditions and learning fromthe experiences of developing and developed countries.

62. The Commissions of UNCTAD perform an important function and shouldcontinue on a more effective basis. In addition, a new Commission on Globalizationand Development Strategies should be established by UNCTAD XII.

63. UNCTAD should be given an expanded mandate on policy space, the conceptand its application.

64. UNCTAD should be asked to expand its work on topical issues that areimportant to the world, including the food crisis, finance and development, climatechange, migration, trade agreements, intellectual property and South–Southcooperation. It must provide a development perspective and show the way forwardon these issues.

65. On climate change, UNCTAD can concentrate on the inter-relationshipbetween climate change and trade and development, with a view to strengtheningdeveloping countries’ ability to withstand the negative impact and effects of climatechange on development, and also to ensure that proposals on climate change thatrelate to trade do not adversely affect developing countries in an imbalanced wayand are in line with the “common but differentiated responsibility” principle.

66. Intellectual property rights (IPRs), and especially their implications for development, have emerged as a major issue of interest and concern to the public worldwide. Civil society organizations and developing country governments are calling for greater flexibilities for developing countries in the implementation of international obligations such as in the agreement on trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights or agreements under the World Intellectual Property Organization. UNCTAD has an important role in highlighting the development dimension in the IPR debate and in assisting developing countries to formulate their IPR measures and legislation in a manner that is development oriented. UNCTAD has been addressing IPR, access to technology and development concerns for many years, and its efforts in this area which are guided by this development perspective should be strengthened.

67. An invigorated UNCTAD is necessary and should not interpret its mandate restrictively. UNCTAD’s technical assistance should be driven by the needs of recipients, including civil society, not those of donors. It should for instance not be limited to implementing existing international frameworks, such as WTO rules, but should also creatively explore development-oriented alternatives in a fast-changing world.

68. The intergovernmental consensus-building role of UNCTAD is important and should be given more emphasis and priority. This can complement the negotiations or discussions taking place in other fora. If taken more seriously, this intergovernmental function can make UNCTAD the venue for a revitalized North– South dialogue on development issues, and on the link between development with trade, finance and other issues.

69. UNCTAD, in collaboration with other United Nations specialized agencies, is examining the impact of the concentration of market power in the hands of a few firms on the international agriculture markets. Similar examples of concentration of power can be found in manufacturing, such as electronics, textiles and clothing, where subcontracting exerts downward pressure on wages and working conditions for those at the bottom end of the supply chain. Reliance on corporate social responsibility to meet these challenges is insufficient: UNCTAD should be given a mandate to explore how best to address market concentration through laws and policies at both the national and international levels.

70. UNCTAD should also play a monitoring role as regards assessments of MNEs’ role and impact on development. To that end, it could foster discussion between developing country governments, other United Nations agencies, business, unions and NGOs.

71. UNCTAD should play a stronger role in ensuring the effective implementation of the Brussels Programme of Action for LDCs for the decade 2001-2010, including through urging and assisting LDCs and their development partners.

72. The primacy of political sovereignty must be assured. Sovereignty over natural resources, commodities and biodiversity should be guaranteed. Although they are conflicting paradigms, both globalization and development are in essence political and political economy processes, and the actual political balance weighing in one or another direction can often be decisive. UNCTAD’s efforts to further the cause of development and its collaboration with those working for development add up to a more favourable political balance.

73. Since UNCTAD X and the Bangkok Plan of Action, the hopes of civil society that UNCTAD and the United Nations would play a greater role in international social, environmental and economic policymaking have been consistently dashed. UNCTAD’s role has been weakened rather than strengthened in recent years, a trend that should be reversed. Although UNCTAD is important, it continues to bedeprived of the means to play a pivotal role, calling into question the credibility ofthe global governance system. In the current context, with the crisis at WTO and inthe Bretton Woods institutions, the need for an alternative forum is even moreimportant. However, this will require a joint effort by all members to engagetowards designing a sustainable model of globalization.

74. We urge UNCTAD to work with civil society organizations, social movements,gender-based movements and community-based groups on a permanent basisthroughout the world. More participation of civil society organizations, in particularNGOs and trade unions in expert meetings and commission meetings, including aspanellists, as well as engagement with civil society in developing countries ontechnical cooperation activities and research is necessary. Research done by civilsociety organizations should be recognized and used by UNCTAD. Hearings withcivil society should engage the whole range of UNCTAD’s membership. TheOrganization indeed has a global role to play. It can contribute to sustainablepolitical and social peace globally.

75. As already stated during UNCTAD XI, we hope that all member States willprovide the necessary support and commitment to make UNCTAD strong enough tocontribute to the political shaping of appropriate policies in the areas of sustainabledevelopment, social inclusion and gender equality all over the world.

 

Accra, 19 April 2008

Publié dans COMMERCE ET DEVELOPPEMENT | 1 Commentaire »

1234
 

LE CMV |
LES ANCIENS DU CHAMPS DE CL... |
Bienvenue chez moi ! |
Unblog.fr | Créer un blog | Annuaire | Signaler un abus | consensus
| presseecrite
| lesjournalistes